Blog Post for Week Three

How the gameplay went according to my expectations: In Star Wars Battlefront, the gameplay went according to my expectations from when I had last played, but with additional maps. As for Lego Harry Potter: Years 1-4, the gameplay went as anticipated which saw me complete three more levels.

Duration of my gameplay:  Roughly four hours (two playing Star Wars Battlefront, two hours playing Lego Harry Potter: Years 1-4)

Title of the game(s): Star Wars Battlefront, Lego Harry Potter: Years 1-4

Platform: Xbox One and Xbox 360

If any other members of the gaming community took part: In Star Wars Battlefront, the duration of my play took place playing alongside and against users online.

 

Welcome to week 3’s entry for BoScorvat’s gaming blog! To start this week’s entry I am going to discuss why I chose the games I did play during this last week and how the titles came into my gaming world. Additionally, I will explain my reaction to the game in the moment and if I had any thoughts afterwards. I will also describe how gaming has affected me –before, during and after I played. Finally, I will discuss what I have learned about my own gaming habits.

 

With the upcoming release of Star Wars Battlefront II, I wanted to get back into the popular Star Wars series. Its predecessor, Star Wars Battlefront, is one of my favourite titles to go back to when I want to play a shooter, even though the game has been out for a couple years now. When the original games (Star Wars: Battlefront and Star Wars: Battlefront II) came out, they were the only games I played on my Playstation 2. Since I enjoyed the two previous games, buying the 2015 installment of Star Wars Battlefront was a no-brainer for me.

In Lego Harry Potter: Years 1-4, I have slowly been playing my way through the game and making sure to get every unlockable to reach 100% completion. The series overall has been in my gaming life for quite some time because I have always enjoyed the challenge of building with Lego. That is why once I got into video games, Lego Batman: The Videogame was one of the very first games I owned. Since then, I have owned, and almost completed, every Lego title to come out.

 

For Star Wars Battlefront, I was pleasantly surprised that I was able to get into a game right away. I thought with the upcoming release of the new game that finding a lobby to play in would take some time. With the season pass free on the Xbox store, I was able to download many new maps which made the game seem new to me. Following my gameplay, my one thought was that even if there was no change to multiplayer action in the new game I would still continue to play it.

As for Lego Harry Potter: Years 1-4, I find my reaction in the moment to be one of satisfaction. Since there is always a part of the game that I would get stuck on for a few minutes, whenever I figure out what to do and complete another level this is the feeling I get. When I finish playing, I wonder just how how many other people get stuck on that part and if it’s because I have never read the books.

 

Usually I go play video games because I’m looking for something to do. Before I played Star Wars Battlefront and Lego Harry Potter: Years 1-4 this week I could describe myself as bored. During gameplay, the idea of being hunted by the Empire while trying to down their AT-AT’s or fight six Dementors with Harry and Hermione brought on a small adrenaline rush that quickly counteracts the boredom. When I finished playing both games, I had a feeling of capability and productiveness since I was able to further myself in each game.

 

I would definitely describe my gaming having “the desire to dominate or compete” (Huizinga, “Huizinga_NatureOfPlay.”) in each game I play. Even if I were just playing by myself, I set personal goals of what I would like to achieve in that particular sitting. Like I have said before, my gaming is “never a task. It is done at leisure, during free time” (Huizinga, “Huizinga_NatureOfPlay.”). It seems to me that games I tend to play use what Juul calls “player effort” (“The Game, the Player, the World: Looking for a Heart of Gameness”). Juul states that “player effort is another way of stating that games are challenging, or that games contain a conflict” (“The Game, the Player, the World: Looking for a Heart of Gameness”).  


Works Cited

Huizinga, Johan. “Huizinga_NatureOfPlay.” The MIT Press, 2006.

 

Juul, Jesper. “The Game, the Player, the World: Looking for a Heart of Gameness”. In Level Up: Digital Games Research Conference Proceedings, edited by Marinka Copier and Joost Raessens, 30-45. Utrecht University, 2003.


Lego Batman: The Videogame. Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment. 2008. Video Game.

 

Lego Harry Potter: Years 1-4. Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment. 2010. Video Game.

 

Playstation 2. Sony Computer Entertainment. 2000. Console.

 

Star Wars Battlefront. Electronic Arts. 2015. Video Game.

 

Star Wars Battlefront II. Electronic Arts. 2017. Video Game.

 

Star Wars: Battlefront. LucasArts. 2004. Video Game.

 

Star Wars: Battlefront II. LucasArts. 2005. Video Game.

 

Xbox One. Microsoft. 2013. Console.

 

Xbox 360. Microsoft. 2005. Console.

Blog Post for Week 2

How the gameplay went according to my expectations: For NHL 18, the gameplay went how I expected it to be but with the needed improvements over NHL 17. In Assassins Creed, I had some hope in my expectations that I would be able to finally pass a difficult level but that did not happen.

Duration of my gameplay:  Roughly four hours (three playing NHL 18, an hour with Assassins Creed)

Title of the game(s): NHL 18, Assassins Creed Black Flag

Platform: Xbox One

If any other members of the gaming community took part: In NHL 18, I took part in a few online versus where I played against other users located globally. My brother and I also played a number of games against each other.

 

Welcome to BoScorvat’s gaming blog! To start this week’s entry I am going to discuss why I chose the games I did play during this last week  and how the title came into my gaming world. Additionally, I will explain my reaction to the game in the moment and if I had any thoughts afterwards. Finally, I will discuss what I have learned about my own gaming habits.

With the release of NHL 18 earlier this month, playing this latest edition has consumed much of my gameplay time. Being a huge hockey/(unfortunately) Canucks fan, I got into the NHL series really early. My first copy of EA Sports’s NHL series came in 2005 when I played it on my parents desktop computer, but it wasn’t until NHL 2009 on the Playstation 2 till I got my first taste of console gaming. Since then, I have played every edition of NHL that is released by EA Sports.

As for Assassins Creed Black Flag there has been a certain level that I have been trying to get past for weeks, each time not making it much further than the last. I stumbled upon Black Flag when it was free sometime ago with my Xbox Live Gold subscription. I had heard lots good things about the series and seen a few gameplay videos online that caught my interest.

Being a new release, NHL 18 had some new gameplay features and in-game improvements that made me excited for its release. My biggest, and most positive, reaction came from the new mode called “NHL Threes”. This mode allowed you let you build your own team and compete 3-on-3 with them on different “circuits” of North America, while collecting items to improve your team. Being an arcade style of hockey, it lets you really get creative with new (and unlockable) dekes and allows for end to end action. After playing for a number of hours this past week, I was left feeling that there is a mode for every type of gamer. Quick games for the casual fan, Franchise for the wanna-be General Manager, and Hockey Ultimate Team for the series die-hard.

In Assassins Creed, my reaction in moment was one of frustration as I continually attempted to defeat a large enemy ship to allow me to continue the story mode. Following my gameplay, I continually think of ways or search for tips that would allow me to sink the ship on my way to completing the game.

Although my immediate family calls me a gamer, I much consider myself a casual gamer. When I get a game, a large majority of my free time is spent grinding out the levels or free-playing. But there are other times I can go weeks without turning on my console and playing them. When I start to do poorly in games or can not get past a certain point I do ‘ease up on the rules’ to let myself have a “greater degree of latitude than the official rules permit” (Caillois, “Caillois_DefinitionOfPlay.”).

In terms of genres of games I generally play, it is quite wide. As described in The Definition of Play and Classification of Games, the classification of games is not needed “since they all respond to the same needs and reflect…the same psychological attitude” (Caillois, “Caillois_DefinitionOfPlay.”). I think that being an on and off again gamer allows my habits of play to be comparable to what is described as free, uncertain, unproductive, and governed by rules (Suits, “Suits_Construction.”).

Works Cited

Assassin’s Creed IV: Black Flag. Ubisoft. 2013. Video Game

 

Caillois, Roger. “Caillois_DefinitionOfPlay.” The MIT Press, 2006.

 

NHL 18. Electronic Arts Sports. 2018. Video Game

 

Suits, Bernard. “Suits_Construction.” N.D.

Academic Methodology 

Each week I will record a log of what I have played, as well as recalling how the gameplay went according to my expectations. My recording will also include the duration of my gameplay, title of the game, platform, and if any other members of the game community took part. This information will then be the basis of a weekly blog to be published on Monday.