Blog Post for Week Twelve

How the gameplay went according to my expectations: Coming into Lego Star Wars: The Force Awakens my only real expectations were to find a few hidden easter eggs, and I succeeded.

Duration of my gameplay: Roughly two hours playing Lego Star Wars: The Force Awakens

Title of the game(s): Lego Star Wars: The Force Awakens

Platform: Xbox One

If any other members of the gaming community took part: All of my gameplay this week was solo play.  

 

Welcome to the final entry, week twelve, of BoScorvat’s gaming blog! To start this week’s entry I am going to discuss why I chose the game that I played during this last week and how the title came into my gaming world. Additionally, I will explain my reaction to the game in the moment and if I had any thoughts afterwards. I will also describe how gaming has affected me before, during and after I played. Finally, I will discuss what I have learned about my own gaming habits.

 

To continue with my Star Wars theme as of late, I chose to play a little of Lego Star Wars: The Force Awakens. With my countless hours spent the week before playing Star Wars Battlefront II, I thought it would only be appropriate to also re-watch the movies the games were based on. The game came into my gaming world after I saw the promotion of it at my local games store and the pre-order bonuses it came with.

 

In Lego Star Wars: The Force Awakens, my reaction in the moment included a little bit of confusion and as I knew there should have been a collectable in a certain place, yet I couldn’t find it. After, cheating, and searching it on YouTube, I found what I was looking for and got drawn into replaying a couple missions. After playing this week, my only thoughts were of satisfaction that I was able to find some more hidden collectables and to fully re-complete a couple levels.

 

With the end of the semester quickly descending on me, I didn’t have much time to play this week but that wasn’t stopping me from getting closer to 100% completion in Lego Star Wars: The Force Awakens. Before I played Lego Star Wars: The Force Awakens this week, I was feeling a little anxious about the end of the semester finishing quite soon. For that reason, during gameplay I was able to relax and enjoy my game rather than worrying about homework. When my time was up for this weeks gameplay, all I really wanted to do was to to continue to play.

 

This habit is one of my lesser known habits since I only tend to do it when I am playing alone. It is that I make strange faces when I play video games. The time when my most interesting expressions occur are if I am on the verge of clearing a difficult level or score a beautiful goal, turning my face up into excitement or disbelief that that could have happened. In one of her TED Talks, Jane McGonigal explains that these emotions on a gamer’s face only when we are on the verge of an “epic win” (“Gaming can make a better world.”).

 

McGonigal continues by describing that “an epic win is an outcome that is so extraordinarily positive, you had no idea it was even possible until you achieved it. It was almost beyond the threshold of imagination, and when you get there, you’re shocked to discover what you’re truly capable of” (“Gaming can make a better world.”). I know on many occasions I have encountered what McGonigal describes first hand.

 

Works Cited

Lego Star Wars: The Force Awakens. Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment. 2016. Video Game.

 

McGonigal, Jane. “Gaming can make a better world.” TED. Feb. 2010. Lecture.

 

Star Wars Battlefront II. Electronic Arts. 2017. Video Game.

 

Xbox One. Microsoft. 2013. Console.

Blog Post for Week Eleven

How the gameplay went according to my expectations: Coming into Star Wars Battlefront II this week I had some high expectations since I enjoyed playing the beta so much and was looking forward to it.

Duration of my gameplay: Roughly six hours playing Star Wars Battlefront II

Title of the game(s): Star Wars Battlefront II

Platform: Xbox One

If any other members of the gaming community took part: This week’s gameplay was a combination of online and solo play.

Welcome to week eleven of BoScorvat’s gaming blog! To start this week’s entry I am going to discuss why I chose the game that I played during this last week and how the title came into my gaming world. Additionally, I will explain my reaction to the game in the moment and if I had any thoughts afterwards. I will also describe how gaming has affected me before, during and after I played. Finally, I will discuss what I have learned about my own gaming habits.

Star Wars Battlefront II was just released this past Friday, and since has been the only game I play. My first time playing the series came in 2004 when the first game in the original series was released, Star Wars: Battlefront. Since playing this original game, I have enjoyed playing all of the Battlefront games by EA and LucasArts.

In Star Wars Battlefront II, my reaction in the moment was one of excitement as I finally was able to play the full game rather than what I was limited to in the beta. After I had finished playing, my thoughts were ones of relief that Star Wars Battlefront II went though the needed upgrades from Star Wars Battlefront to allow me to enjoy the game so much more.

Since Star Wars Battlefront II was a new release, I was really looking forward to playing the new single player campaign since it was not a part of the beta. Before I played Battlefront II this week, I was feeling excited to finally play the full game. During gameplay, I was filled with adrenaline as I battled the Rebellion as Iden Versio. When I finished playing, which was after quite some time, I was impressed with the new campaign mode and improved multiplayer modes.

Looking into my gaming habits, I wouldn’t say that the violent video games I play translate in any way into violent behaviour. Schulzke says that violent video games “train players in the skills needed to harm others, that they degrade players’ capacity for empathy, and that they directly encourage antisocial behavior” (“Schulzke-Defending-moralit.pdf”). Although I have played many games that include gameplay that might promote a lack of empathy towards others or train to you to become an assassin, in the end they are just a fantasy world with, mostly, fictional characters.

 

Works Cited

Schulzke, Marcus. “Schulzke-Defending-moralit.pdf” Unknown, 2010.

 

Star Wars Battlefront. Electronic Arts. 2015. Video Game.

 

Star Wars Battlefront II. Electronic Arts. 2017. Video Game.

 

Star Wars: Battlefront. LucasArts. 2004. Video Game.

 

Xbox One. Microsoft. 2013. Console.

Blog Post for Week Ten

How the gameplay went according to my expectations: Coming into Call of Duty WWII this week my only expectations were to try out this newest game in the series and see if it was as good as the trailer/previews made it out to be. As for Lego: The Hobbit, I just was looking to continue playing in the Lord of the Rings world.

Duration of my gameplay: Roughly three and a half hours playing Call of Duty WWII and Lego: The Hobbit combined

Title of the game(s): Call of Duty WWII and Lego: The Hobbit

Platform: Xbox One

If any other members of the gaming community took part: My gameplay this week was offline co-op play in Call of Duty WWII and solo play in Lego: The Hobbit.

Welcome to week ten of BoScorvat’s gaming blog! To start this week’s entry I am going to discuss why I chose the game that I played during this last week and how the title came into my gaming world. Additionally, I will explain my reaction to the game in the moment and if I had any thoughts afterwards. I will also describe how gaming has affected me before, during and after I played. Finally, I will discuss what I have learned about my own gaming habits.

I played Call of Duty WWII this week since I wanted to be able to keep up to my brother when we played together. Call of Duty WWII came into my gaming world after my brother got the game last week.

After completing Lego: Lord of the Rings during last weeks gameplay, I wanted to continue from where I left off and played Lego: The Hobbit this week. During the summer when there were a number of deals on, I went of game buying spree and Lego: The Hobbit was one of the games I purchased.

In Call of Duty WWII, my reaction in the moment was one of frustration as I found the distinction between your teammates and enemies very minimal and hard to tell who was who. After playing this week, my only thoughts were that the game was very real, but the lack of distinction between teammates and enemies hindered my kill to death ratio.

While in Lego: The Hobbit, my reaction in the moment was one of satisfaction as I understood the story that was unfolding in front of me. After logging several hours of gameplay in Lego: The Hobbit this week, my only thoughts were that it was a more enjoyable experience when I had understood the characters and the quest they had in front of them.

This weeks gaming allowed me to play alongside my brother, which is a rarity since we are both so competitive. Before I played Call of Duty WWII and Lego: The Hobbit this week, I was looking forward to a relaxing video game session after a busy week. For that reason, during gameplay I was able to relax and enjoy my brothers complaints that I was doing better than him and to take my mind off of school. When I finished playing, I was left with a feeling of satisfaction as I played a couple rounds of above 500 and played the first number of levels.

It is not so much a habit, but I find that it is encouraging to see female protagonists in the games I play. This is something that was apart of the journal article by Jansz and Martis where they “found that the possibility to identify with a female protagonist contributed to girls’ appreciation of video games” (“The Lara Phenomenon: Powerful Female Characters in Video Games.”). This appreciation has then now translated into 50% of women in video games being portrayed in a dominant position (Jansz, J and Martis, R, “The Lara Phenomenon: Powerful Female Characters in Video Games.”). Although video games are moving in the right direction in regards to the inclusion of female protagonists, there can always be hope that there will be more in upcoming games.

Works Cited

Call of Duty: WWII. Activision. 2017. Video Game.

Jansz, Jeroen and Raynel G. Martis. “The Lara Phenomenon: Powerful Female Characters in Video Games.” Sex Roles, vol. 56, no. 3-4, Feb. 2007, pp. 141-148. EBSCOhost, doi:10.1007/s11199-006-9158-0.

Lego: The Hobbit. Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment. 2014. Video Game.

Lego: Lord of the Rings. Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment. 2012. Video Game.

Xbox One. Microsoft. 2013. Console.

Blog Post for Week Nine

How the gameplay went according to my expectations: Coming into Lego: Lord of the Rings this week my only expectations were to continue to get further in the game.

Duration of my gameplay: Roughly two and a half hours playing Lego: Lord of the Rings

Title of the game(s): Lego: Lord of the Rings

Platform: Xbox 360

If any other members of the gaming community took part: All of my gameplay this week was solo play, but my brother did play co-op with me for a short time.

Welcome to week nine of BoScorvat’s gaming blog! To start this week’s entry I am going to discuss why I chose the game that I played during this last week and how the title came into my gaming world. Additionally, I will explain my reaction to the game in the moment and if I had any thoughts afterwards. I will also describe how gaming has affected me before, during and after I played. Finally, I will discuss what I have learned about my own gaming habits.

Moving this last week gave a chance to go through all of my games before I put them into a box. It was then that I saw Lego: Lord of the Rings and remembered that I was oh so close to finishing the game before I went to Lego: The Hobbit. Before playing Lego: Lord of the Rings, I knew very little about the LOTR series in general. But, got into it after watching the first movie in the series on Netflix and when I saw the game on sale at EB Games a few days after.

In Lego: Lord of the Rings, my reaction in the moment was one of confusion as there were a few times when I wasn’t sure what to do. After spending too much time on something that was right in front of me, I was happy to get to move on. After playing this week, my only thoughts were that I wish there was more background story for those players that don’t know the series as well as others.

Since I didn’t have much time to play this week, I wanted to make sure it counted by furthering myself towards completing Lego: Lord of the Rings. Before I played Lord of the Rings this week, I was feeling a little anxious about all the upcoming work I have to do in the next week or so. For that reason, during gameplay I was able to relax and enjoy my game to take my mind off of things. When I finished playing, I was left with a feeling of wanting to continue to play but instead had to start on some homework.

Upon reflecting on my gaming habits, a majority of my games are sports-themed. One of the reasons why these games are my favourite because of realistic they are and how they even can be enjoyable for those who don’t follow a specific sport closely. I really don’t follow basketball and football (if fantasy football doesn’t count) that closely, but quite enjoy playing the two video games. This popularity in sports-themed games is even noted by Crawford and Gosling when they say “in 2006 sports-themed games made up 17% of all console-based games sales—second only to the all-inclusive category of action games” (“More Than a Game: Sports-Themed Video Games and Player Narratives.”).

Works Cited

Crawford, Garry and Victoria K. Gosling. “More Than a Game: Sports-Themed Video Games and Player Narratives.” Sociology of Sport Journal, vol. 26, no. 1, Mar. 2009, pp. 50-66.

Lego: The Hobbit. Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment. 2014. Video Game.

Lego: Lord of the Rings. Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment. 2012. Video Game.

Xbox 360. Microsoft. 2005. Console.