ice cream coneI have been suffering all week from writer’s block.  What do I talk about?  Yikes, have I run out of things to say already?  It’s going to be a long 2 years…

I decided to revisit the suggested readings for this week.  I became inspired by Van Weigel’s article “From Course Management to Curricular Capabilities”.  In it, he presents an alternative approach to online learning; one where the LMS “facilitates the development of learner capabilities in critical thinking, self-confidence, peer learning and knowledge management” rather than controls the design and ultimately the “pedagogical effectiveness” of the course.

These learner capabilities fit with my online teaching philosophy and I need to be asking myself how my LMS/non-LMS online course addresses each of these areas.  For example, in the area of self-confidence, Weigel posed the question “how do you provide meaningful and reflective environment for failure that also does not discourage learners?”  Currently, any online work I have created involves students reading content, watching videos and then completing an online quiz for marks.  Not very inspiring.  And not a meaningful way to learn from any mistakes or misunderstandings they may have on the material.  Resources from textbook suppliers now come with tools that are meant to “learn” with the student, by analyzing what questions they got wrong and then steering them towards more practice on that particular concept.  Again, while giving the student extra practice, it doesn’t necessarily translate into meaningful analysis of why they made the mistake in the first place.

I am quite happy with D2L as my main hub, a place for students to begin their learning journey.  One feature I really like in D2L, but haven’t spent much time getting to know, is the e-Portfolio.  This feature supports my desire to encourage life-long learning, as students can continue to add to the e-Portfolio from any course, and it can be taken with them when they leave the VIU.

However, after exploring new (to me) Web 2.0 tools over the past week, I can see that there are some viable alternatives or additions to the tools within D2L that may help me move towards my teaching goals.  For example, D2L does have a discussions feature, but it is often challenging to follow a thread, and can be very overwhelming when you get behind on the readings and see you have 149 unread messages!  It is also very text-oriented, although you can include links to videos and photos through the “insert stuff” button.  Using non-LMS tools such as Padlet, Google docs or Twiddla, students can collaborate in real time, incorporating audio and visual in addition to text.  These tools can be used to support peer learning, such as study groups or brainstorming sessions.

To the best of my knowledge, D2L does not provide any means of synchronous sessions.  Each of our OLTD courses thus far has relied on tools like Collaborate to conduct our face-to-face meetings.  My courses will continue to include classroom time for the foreseeable future, but it is something I will definitely have to consider if I go 100% online.  Meeting as a group provides opportunities for peer teaching (as with our experience in OLTD 503) and interactive activities such as jigsaws and group discussions.

As I move through OLTD 504, I’m beginning to see how a blend of both LMS and non-LMS services can be beneficial for both teachers and students.  Just like a blend of my favourite ice cream flavours!

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