One effective self-regulated learning strategy is interweaving course content or interleaving. Interleaving is the practice of switching between ideas while studying as this strengthen  understanding on topics previously learned while creating links and connections between topics. I have been using, demonstrating, and teaching this concept in my math classes. As I am not with my students when they are studying I am demonstrating the usefulness of interleaving in three ways:

  1. As homework suggestions
  2. During regularly scheduled class activities
  3. During instruction time

Homework Suggestions:

The easiest change to make were homework suggestions. While students had standing instructions to practice the topics explored that day, I made a point of recommending other previous topics to look at. Thus my new instructions each day were, for example: “Try practicing what we learned today, factoring using the difference of squares, but also try 1 questions of graphing and 1 simplifying an algebraic radical”

Class Activities:

Changing class activities & assignments took more time to prepare. Each new group activity/assignment now included one or two questions on a previously learned topic. While it was nice when the previous material had a strong link to the new material, I wasn’t very worried about always finding a strong link as mixing up old and new allows students to find their own links.

As one student noted, testing has material all mixed up, so why not activities?

Instructional Time:

During instruction I made an effort to remind students of previous material and how that related to the new material. Math can be ‘silo-ed’ if not careful. I also made a point of choosing questions from other units to solve, mixing up the new with the old which keeps everything fresh in the minds of my students.

My math class looked like: teach, student practice, teach, student practice, teach, student practice, teach, student practice, teach, student practice, teach, student practice, teach, student practice, review, test. Also, I had taught similar concepts as unique, separate entities. For example, there are 4 different chapters of binomial factoring. I taught one, after another, over 2 or 3 days.

I changed my thinking in how I approached math class to incorporate ‘clumping’ of similar strategies (Nilson, 2013). Now, for example, all four chapters in binomial factoring were taught in 1 day. Students could now see similarities and differences in similar material. This left SPACE in my teaching schedule. I decided to incorporate activates on those days. Activities would be done in groups of 2 – 4 and help students master aspects of the course.

Within the activities, I would embed Self-Regulation learning strategies. Initially the strategies were implicit, as the term progresses I changed my thinking and made the strategies explicit. For example I said “A great learning strategy is called Dual Coding. Dual Coding means combining words and visuals. Essentially you look at visuals and explain them in words or take information and draw a visual.” Then I got the students to use that strategy in the activity. My goal was to have students understand why I was doing something.

I believe that test corrections are very important in math. Thus, once I have returned a math test, I ask students to make corrections to their test and hand it back in for marks. To expand and enhance test corrections, I created a ‘test wrapper’. Students would answer a few simple questions before the test, a few simple questions after they completed the test corrections and I would be able to have a conversation with them about how they approach studying math, their motivation for being in the course, and their confidence level with the material. I saw it as a simple way to have a conversation about their learning in a math course.

One unexpected benefit with the test wrappers was the 2 or 3 simple questions at the beginning of the test really grounded the students. It gave everyone a simple starting place, essentially the first couple of steps on the test journey. I forgot the wrapper (once) on a test and students immediately asked where it was – I had to promise to put it there for the test corrections (and for the next test)

Overall I am pleased with the changes to my course

Lat year at VIU I was part of the VIU Council on Learning and Teaching Excellence. My person goal was to provide more support to aboriginal students in my Physics class. I found that the changes I made had a profound  affect on all the students in class.

Here is a video of what each member of my Accessible Learning and Inclusive Design group did – I speak second

 

 

 

 

Recently I completed my Master’s of Education (focus Educational Leadership & Online Learning and Teaching)

Here is a link to my completed Master’s:  http://viuspace.viu.ca/handle/10613/2657

My Goal was to design a first year blended transitional course on the effective use of digital tools for academic purposes that also includes the implications of the student’s digital footprint, professionalism and personal learning networks

Course Overview & Learning Outcomes:

Unit 1.  Introduction to Web 2.0

Digital Footprint and professionalism – a student’s perspective

  • Understand the implications of digital profile in terms of longevity, reach, and changing context.
  • Understand and assess the influence of an online profile.
  • Explain strategies for online reputation management.

Privacy Roles and Responsibilities – Sharing information online

  • Use social networking sites in an educational setting in an appropriate and secure fashion while protecting users’ privacy (e.g., Facebook, Instagram, Flickr)
  • Demonstrate protection of privacy and freedom of information in dealing with own and others’ personal information.
  • Discern among private, recordable, confidential and sensitive information (e.g., what may be shared, what legal or professional obligations exist, what consent is required, etc.)
  • Describe how to comply with VIU’s Technology Acceptable Use Policy and other student ethical conduct policies and program-based professional guidelines.

Unit 2.  Telling Your Story – Introduction

Creating a professional image online – E-Portfolios

  • Create and curate an academic profile (i.e. D2L E-portfolio or WordPress)

Ways to tell a story (blogging, etc.)

  • Use a broad range of media texts in order to express ideas through multiple forms of media (e.g., traditional print, electronic, digital, etc.)
  • Create and share multimedia objects, applying best practices.
  • Create and use a personal web-space to express ideas.

Unit 3.  Tools and Technology

Working together online

  • Create and participate in a personal learning network.
  • Use video and web conferencing tools and instant communication tools (i.e. D2L, Collaborate, Google hangouts, etc.) for learning or research.
  • Engage in group development using collaborative creation (e.g. discussion forums)
  • Collaboratively create documents with peers (e.g., shared creation and editing using Google docs, Coggle, etc.)

Digital Presentation

  • Appropriately and efficiently share digital media such as podcasts, music, and video.
  • Optimize and use digital images, audio, and video in a variety of formats (i.e. Text based software such as Prezi, SlideShare, etc.; video media such as Prezi, SlideShare, VIUTube, YouTube, ActivePresenter, Jing, etc.; and audio media such as podcasts, etc.)

Digital Study Tools

  • Use social networking tools for communication related to learning or research.
  • Access and utilize current reference programs for citations and attributions
  • Demonstrate a critical understanding of electronic tools available for creating and managing online resources (e.g. mind-mapping software, flashcard programs, Library apps, organizers such as Symbaloo, etc.)

Unit 4.  Telling Your Story Revisited – Tying it all together

Final E-portfolio presentation

  • Demonstrate course mastery through uploaded assignments into an e-Portfolio

For some time I have been wanting to incorporate aboriginal ways of learning and knowing in to my teaching practice. This semester I will be teaching Physics 047 & Chemistry 047 (Grade 11 equivalent). I haven’t been fully satisfied with the atmosphere of the classes, many sit alone and we really only incorporate a very liner thinking processes. VIU is very fortunate that it is on Snuneymuxw Territory.

Liesel Knaack, at the Centre for Innovation and Excellence in Learning, offered to help me in my journey to expand my ways of teaching. To that end she connected me with Sharon Hobenshield, Director of Aboriginal Education. Sharon called together an Indigenization circle for science class learning which comprised of an Elder, Faculty and Students who wanted to share and support me.

It was truly an amazing experience that touched my soul. Everyone was so supportive. The students told me what worked for them and what they appreciated. The Elder reminded me that this was only one step on a student’s journey, that they come from somewhere and go somewhere. They was so much information and support.

I created an initial mind-map from what I took out of the experience. Initially, on my first day of class, I plan to acknowledge the territory that I work on and have the students sitting in a circle, where they can make eye contact and connect (no voices from behind). I will also get students to introduce themselves, starting on the right so they can learn about each other.

Indigenization Learning Circle

Indigenization Learning Circle

 

I am currently working on my paper to go with my Master’s Project for my M.ED at VIU. I am interested in the topic. I am teaching the course that I am writing about (FNFS 103. Succeeding Online: Tools and Technology for Learning) in September. Thus my Masters will really prepare me for my students in September. The problem? The weather is beautiful, things need doing, the ocean is calling, Facebook is distracting…. In short everything and nothing.

Heck, right now I am updating my blog rather than working on my Masters…..

What are you procrastinating doing?

We did it. I am so proud of all of us.

20150527_165356I was very fortunate that I was invited to attend the presentation of the new convocation suite by renowned artist Arthur Vickers. I am a part of the first graduating class that will be using these at Vancouver Island University.

The ceremony was extraordinary with dance & words. I do not have any pictures  as i wanted to enjoy the moment. i did take some pictures after, though they do not do the work justice.

The Courses

  • OLTD 501 – Introduction to Online Learning – Competencies and Environments
  • OLTD 502 – Digital Learning Continuum
  • OLTD 503 – Online Communication
  • OLTD 504 – Special Topics-Learning Systems
  • OLTD 505 – Special Topics-Open Educational Resources
  • OLTD 506 – Special Topics-Social Media
  • OLTD 507 – Special Topics-Cloud Computing
  • OLTD 508 – Special Topics- Mobile Learning and Gaming
  • OLTD 509 – Emergent Environments and Technologies
  • OLTD 510 – Capstone Learnings
29. April 2015 · Write a comment · Categories: OLTD · Tags: , ,

Evidence: Video of Minecraft world created

Learning Outcomes:

  • Plan learning opportunities most suitable to the strengths and challenges of a variety of mobile learning and gaming environments
  • Develop skills to optimize learning experiences through personalization based on characteristics, needs, stages of development, current personalized learning mandates, and misconceptions

I was very much a newbie to the world of Minecraft before this assignment. I had heard of it, seen people dress up as characters from it, but never so much as looked at it. For this assignment we had to ‘play’ in the Minecraft world and determine how it could be used in the classroom. In order to figure out how to use it in the classroom, I had to play with it my self and evaluate it with the rubric that Jay, Corina & I built. After all, how can I evaluate a tool for use in the classroom if I could not use it myself?

What I discovered is that Minecraft is a very flexible, creative world that has tremendous applications in the classroom. As you can see on the video, I tested the world for use in Math and Biology. I am especially happy how my labelled ‘cell’ turned out. For visual learners, students who love gaming or creative people, the ability to create three dimensional structures to illustrate concepts (or for example calculate volumes and areas in math) really personalizes the learning experience. Students can work collaboratively or individually, this can be done in the classroom or from a distance. the key word is personalization.

Are there some challenges to having Minecraft assignments? Sure. I work with adults. Not all of them will be interested in this or could afford to buy the program. In the k-12 systems there are also challenges (though MinecraftEdu eliminate a bunch of them!). Overall Minecraft scored very high on the game evaluation rubric. While it is certainly a tool that I would use in the classroom I would likely make it an optional assignment or alternative way of presenting a project. Participating in this assignment really opened my eyes to what games can do in education