As part of the course I am taking on Educational Development I had to read two papers and answer the question: Consider what is it about educational development that makes it engaging and challenging at times, sometimes at the same time. Here are my thoughts:

Challenges:

  • Defensive Position – Constantly having to justify why you do and why you do it. Even with senior administration there is a lack of education about the position. The perception of others may be that the position is unnecessary or a waste of money
  • Uncertain Career Path. Often Educational Developers are seen as “Tier two” academics (if they are even seen as academics). The career path may have no progression or movement opportunities. Climbing the ivory tower can be difficult as there can be a prestigious in the position
  • Unrecognized as Academics. Many Educational Developer have no recognition of their service or rewards typical for academics. Thus there is exclusion. Excluded from research & evaluation opportunities

Benefits:

  • Support. Tremendous outside support from other Educational Developers
  • Valued. Individuals at institutions value the advice and offerings of Educational Developers
  • Unique Talents. To be successful in this role, a variety of skills and abilities are needed.
  • Interesting. The position itself is multi-faceted. Like a unique job every day? I suspect this is a career for you

Gender:

The first paper listed below was, in my opinion, the most interesting one as it looked at the position of an educational developer with respect to gender. Typically women occupy fewer positions in higher education. Gender imbalance increases as you climb the corporate ladder in higher education. This is not the case, however, with Educational Developers where women dominate in numbers in the field and in positions of leadership. Why do women hold greater numbers of positions and leadership roles in this discipline? Possiblely is is due to the supportive and service nature of the position. The job is typically coded with “feminine” words and skills. While these skills are a benefit in the position, they may be seen as a liability when attempting to climb the ivory tower.

Most Educational Developers have doctoral degrees and are very qualified for their position, yet the positions themselves may be uncertain or ambiguous; the position is often not valued by the institution. Is the marginalization due to the “pink ghetto” phenomenon? The position is not typically underpaid, but is often in the periphery and can be systematically excluded. How to fix this marginalization? Bernhagen and Gravett suggest being explicit in the work done, its importance and the role you have. Also, in academia, it is important not to neglect or undervalue scholarship

 

 

Bernhagen, L. and Gravett, E. (2017) Educational development as pink collar labor: Implications and recommendations., To Improve the Academy, 36(1), 9-19. DOI: 10.1002/tia2.20053

Kensington-Miller, B., Renc-Roe, J. and Moron-Garcia, S. (2015) The chameleon on a tartan rug: Adaptations of three academic developers’ professional identities, International Journal for Academic Development, 20(3), 279 – 290. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/1360144X.2015.1047373

 

25. September 2017 · 2 comments · Categories: My Blog · Tags:

Lately I have be interested in the field of Educational Development. My burning questions seems to be: What is an Educational Developer? What do they do? Is this a field that I am interested in pursuing?

Fortunately there is an 8 week, fully online course that I am taking to answer these questions.

This was the email I got:

Introduction to Educational Development – an international course for new and would be educational developers.

This fully online, free of charge, 8 week course has been devised to provide an introduction to educational development. What is it, who does it, what is like?

Educational development has been variously described as supporting faculty / academics to improve the student experience by using evidence based good practice in classrooms, lecture theatres and labs. But what is it like to be an educational developer? Might this suit you as a career? How do you get into the field?

How could I not sign-up? The first day is today, there seems to be a lot or reading, listening & discussing. Looks fabulous. Now I just need to convert Eastern Standard Time to my time zone for a meet up at the end of the week…

Here are two great blog posts about being an educational developer: Part 1 and Part 2

 

15. May 2017 · Write a comment · Categories: My Blog · Tags:

At the VIU Teaching & Learning Conference 2017 we were summarizing the days work in post-in notes.

My key thoughts from the keynote: Dr. Kimberly Tanner, PhD

  • “Teaching is the neurobiology of lots of brains”
  • “Teaching and learning are fundamentally about changing the human brain”
  • If learning is about brain changing, then students
    • Must be awake, attending, and interested
    • need to activate related knowledge / memories / circuits so that they connect these to new understandings
    • are only then likely ready for constructing new knowledge (circuits)
    • need opportunities to self-assess their understanding and identify confusions

Here I am hard at work:

This week I attended the Vancouver Island University Teaching and Learning Conference and had the pleasure in attending many workshops & presentations. Once workshop that I want to focus on in this moment was by Janet Sinclair & Brain Walker called “Telling our Story: Indigenous Portfolio Development” about IRLP 100 (Indigenous Learning and Recognition Portfolio). I was interested in this workshop as I have many students who are taking this, while taking classes with me. Students come out of IRLP 100 transformed. They become confident in self, supportive in others & have a clear vision of their future.

Janet & Brian gave an overview of the course of the course and had the participants do ‘mini’ versions of some of the activities that are in the class. Once in particular stuck with me. They asked us to think of a transformative moment in our life and then determine what we learned from it. I have to admit, I panicked a little at the question, but was quickly able to think of a moment in time. When I was 16, I traveled to Switzerland with my cousin to visit family. The whole trip changed me, moments throughout the trip are etched in to brain & soul but there was one experience that has continued to define me.

At the end of the trip, when it was time to go, my family said “you’ll be fine” and sent me on my way home. Alone I had to catch a tram down the mountain they lived on, caught a train to Paris, walked from the train station to my hotel, overnight-ed at the hotel, caught a cab to the metro, the metro to the airport & flew home all by myself. There were challenges along the way – my bags were heavy, but some kind people at a pub(!) held half my bags for me till I checked in to the hotel – I had lost my plane ticket & my french is poor. Somehow, it all was fine. It did all work out. I took one step at a time, and fixed any problem that I encountered.

I was left with a feeling that I could do anything that needed to be done. While I happily accepted help from others (the kindness of strangers can be a wonderful thing) I was fine on my own. I could and did survive & succeed.

20. March 2017 · Write a comment · Categories: My Blog · Tags: , ,

One effective self-regulated learning strategy is interweaving course content or interleaving. Interleaving is the practice of switching between ideas while studying as this strengthen  understanding on topics previously learned while creating links and connections between topics. I have been using, demonstrating, and teaching this concept in my math classes. As I am not with my students when they are studying I am demonstrating the usefulness of interleaving in three ways:

  1. As homework suggestions
  2. During regularly scheduled class activities
  3. During instruction time

Homework Suggestions:

The easiest change to make were homework suggestions. While students had standing instructions to practice the topics explored that day, I made a point of recommending other previous topics to look at. Thus my new instructions each day were, for example: “Try practicing what we learned today, factoring using the difference of squares, but also try 1 questions of graphing and 1 simplifying an algebraic radical”

Class Activities:

Changing class activities & assignments took more time to prepare. Each new group activity/assignment now included one or two questions on a previously learned topic. While it was nice when the previous material had a strong link to the new material, I wasn’t very worried about always finding a strong link as mixing up old and new allows students to find their own links.

As one student noted, testing has material all mixed up, so why not activities?

Instructional Time:

During instruction I made an effort to remind students of previous material and how that related to the new material. Math can be ‘silo-ed’ if not careful. I also made a point of choosing questions from other units to solve, mixing up the new with the old which keeps everything fresh in the minds of my students.

My math class looked like: teach, student practice, teach, student practice, teach, student practice, teach, student practice, teach, student practice, teach, student practice, teach, student practice, review, test. Also, I had taught similar concepts as unique, separate entities. For example, there are 4 different chapters of binomial factoring. I taught one, after another, over 2 or 3 days.

I changed my thinking in how I approached math class to incorporate ‘clumping’ of similar strategies (Nilson, 2013). Now, for example, all four chapters in binomial factoring were taught in 1 day. Students could now see similarities and differences in similar material. This left SPACE in my teaching schedule. I decided to incorporate activates on those days. Activities would be done in groups of 2 – 4 and help students master aspects of the course.

Within the activities, I would embed Self-Regulation learning strategies. Initially the strategies were implicit, as the term progresses I changed my thinking and made the strategies explicit. For example I said “A great learning strategy is called Dual Coding. Dual Coding means combining words and visuals. Essentially you look at visuals and explain them in words or take information and draw a visual.” Then I got the students to use that strategy in the activity. My goal was to have students understand why I was doing something.

I believe that test corrections are very important in math. Thus, once I have returned a math test, I ask students to make corrections to their test and hand it back in for marks. To expand and enhance test corrections, I created a ‘test wrapper’. Students would answer a few simple questions before the test, a few simple questions after they completed the test corrections and I would be able to have a conversation with them about how they approach studying math, their motivation for being in the course, and their confidence level with the material. I saw it as a simple way to have a conversation about their learning in a math course.

One unexpected benefit with the test wrappers was the 2 or 3 simple questions at the beginning of the test really grounded the students. It gave everyone a simple starting place, essentially the first couple of steps on the test journey. I forgot the wrapper (once) on a test and students immediately asked where it was – I had to promise to put it there for the test corrections (and for the next test)

Overall I am pleased with the changes to my course

Lat year at VIU I was part of the VIU Council on Learning and Teaching Excellence. My person goal was to provide more support to aboriginal students in my Physics class. I found that the changes I made had a profound  affect on all the students in class.

Here is a video of what each member of my Accessible Learning and Inclusive Design group did – I speak second

 

 

 

 

For some time I have been wanting to incorporate aboriginal ways of learning and knowing in to my teaching practice. This semester I will be teaching Physics 047 & Chemistry 047 (Grade 11 equivalent). I haven’t been fully satisfied with the atmosphere of the classes, many sit alone and we really only incorporate a very liner thinking processes. VIU is very fortunate that it is on Snuneymuxw Territory.

Liesel Knaack, at the Centre for Innovation and Excellence in Learning, offered to help me in my journey to expand my ways of teaching. To that end she connected me with Sharon Hobenshield, Director of Aboriginal Education. Sharon called together an Indigenization circle for science class learning which comprised of an Elder, Faculty and Students who wanted to share and support me.

It was truly an amazing experience that touched my soul. Everyone was so supportive. The students told me what worked for them and what they appreciated. The Elder reminded me that this was only one step on a student’s journey, that they come from somewhere and go somewhere. They was so much information and support.

I created an initial mind-map from what I took out of the experience. Initially, on my first day of class, I plan to acknowledge the territory that I work on and have the students sitting in a circle, where they can make eye contact and connect (no voices from behind). I will also get students to introduce themselves, starting on the right so they can learn about each other.

Indigenization Learning Circle

Indigenization Learning Circle

 

I am currently working on my paper to go with my Master’s Project for my M.ED at VIU. I am interested in the topic. I am teaching the course that I am writing about (FNFS 103. Succeeding Online: Tools and Technology for Learning) in September. Thus my Masters will really prepare me for my students in September. The problem? The weather is beautiful, things need doing, the ocean is calling, Facebook is distracting…. In short everything and nothing.

Heck, right now I am updating my blog rather than working on my Masters…..

What are you procrastinating doing?

05. June 2015 · Write a comment · Categories: My Blog · Tags:

We did it. I am so proud of all of us.