Brunei Darussalam Government Scholarships

The Commonwealth of Learning (COL), working in partnership with the Brunei Darussalam Government, wishes to announce Master’s Degree scholarships for five people from Commonwealth countries, preferably working in Higher Education Institutions or Departments of Higher Education, to study on a full-time basis in Brunei Darussalam for one or two years.

The scholarships are available for programmes commencing in July/August 2016 in three participating institutions in Brunei Darussalam.

  1.  Universiti Brunei Darussalam (UBD)
  2.  Universiti Islam Sultan Sharif Ali (UNISSA)
  3.  Institut Teknologi Brunei (ITB)

Each scholarship covers tuition fees, one return economy air ticket, allowances (personal expenses, food, etc.), and residential accommodation.

Applicants are invited to apply directly to the Brunei Darussalam Government as stated on the Application Form and submit a copy of the complete application package to Dr Godson Gatsha, COL Education Specialist, Higher Education at ggatsha@col.org by 6 January 2016.

For specific details on the terms and conditions of the scholarships, including entry requirements and the application form, click here.

Application deadline: 9 January 2016

Digital Media in Cuba – MA in Anthropology

Interested in pursuing a Masters in Anthropology in Digital Media, specifically in Cuba?  If yes, read on; a call out from UVic.


Hello Anthropology students,

Interested in digital media and working in Cuba? Looking for an MA program to apply to?

If you are planning on applying to the University of Victoria Master’s program in our anthropology department (applications due by January 15th 2016 in order to start in Fall 2016) and are interested in working in Cuba, please find attached a call for students to work on Digital Media in Cuba on research project under the direction of Dr. Alexandrine Boudreault-Fournier.

Why anthropology at UVic? Master’s program in UVic’s Anthropology department. How to apply.

Fieldwork Funding Opportunity – Jacobs Research Funds

The Jacobs Research Funds (JRF) funds projects involving fieldwork with living peoples of North, Central and South America which result in publication or other dissemination of information about the fieldwork. Priority is given to research on endangered cultures and languages, and to research on the Pacific Northwest. Projects focusing on archival research have low priority, but we welcome proposals to digitize, transcribe and translate old materials that might otherwise be lost or become inaccessible. Relevance of the project to contemporary theoretical issues in anthropology and linguistics is also a criterion used in evaluating proposals.

Funded projects typically focus on linguistic analysis, social-cultural anthropology, ethnolinguistics, or sociolinguistics. Especially appropriate are field studies that address cultural expressive systems, such as music, language, dance, mythology, world view, folk taxonomy, art, intellectual life, and religion. Also appropriate are projects focusing on cultural and linguistic forms in modern contexts, for example, traditional environmental knowledge or social organization.

Projects in archeology, physical anthropology, applied anthropology, and applied linguistics (for example, grants exclusively for technological improvements, development of pedagogical materials, etc.) are not eligible for support. It is expected that both the subjects of research and society in general will ultimately benefit from the knowledge generated by the funded research. The Jacobs Research Funds therefore do not support proprietary research for the exclusive use of any entity, public or private (such as national, state, provincial, or local governments; public or private charities, churches or foundations; tribes or bands; or community groups).

Grant categories
1. Individual Grants support research projects administered by a single investigator on a focused problem. The maximum award is $3000 USD or CAD.
2. Group Grants support work by two or more researchers who will be cooperating on the same or similar projects. The maximum award is $6000 USD or CAD.
3. The Kinkade Grants honour the memory of the late Dale Kinkade, a linguist known for his work on Salishan languages. Kinkade Grants support projects requiring an intense period of fieldwork, such as research leading to a major work such as a dictionary, collection of texts, etc. They are intended for experienced researchers, such as Ph.D. students working on dissertations, faculty with sabbatical or other period of course release, or retired professors seeking to complete major research. The maximum award is $9000 USD or CAD.

Grant recipients based in Canada will be funded in Canadian dollars through the Whatcom Museum Society British Columbia.

Application Procedure
Please see: https://depts.washington.edu/jacobsf/application.html

For any questions on the application process, please contact jgrant@cob.org

Deadline: All materials must be received by February 15th, 2016

Commonwealth Scholarship – India

Here’s a great opportunity for an upper-level undergraduate!  Note that the deadline is December 21, 2015.


The Indian Council for Cultural Relations (ICCR) has launched its scholarship competition under the prestigious Commonwealth Scholarship Plan 2016-2017. Two scholarships are available to Canadians who wish to study or conduct research in India. The scholarships, which are tenable as of September 2016, provide funding for the full length of academic programs in India at the undergraduate, Master’s or PhD levels. The scholarship for PhD scholars may be renewed for a maximum of five and a half years.

The deadline to apply is December 21, 2015. Please visit  Commonwealth Scholarship Plan – India for full program details.

The Commonwealth Scholarship and Fellowship Plan (CSFP) was established in 1959, with the first scholars selected in 1960. The goal of the Plan is to nurture educational links among Commonwealth countries and to strengthen the ideals upon which the Commonwealth was founded. Over 27,000 Commonwealth citizens have held awards – many going on to reach the very highest levels within their profession.

AnthroNotes Digital Project – database

News for the editors of AnthroNotes:

AnthroNotes Editors Launch Searchable, Downloadable Digital Database

Interested in ancient Egypt, Native Americans, Arctic climate change, or archaeology? Thanks to a joint effort of the Smithsonian’s Department of Anthropology and Smithsonian Libraries, anyone now can download in-depth, research-based essays and classroom tested teaching activities on a wide range of topics through the AnthroNotes digital database.

The entire collection of 84 issues of AnthroNotes (1979-2012) and 263 selected individual AnthroNotes articles, each with a new abstract, can be downloaded from the Smithsonian Libraries’ Official Digital Repository. Individual articles are offered in three formats, designed for computers (PDF), mobile devices (mobi), and e-readers (E-Pub). Articles are free of copyright restrictions; photocopying for classroom use is permitted and encouraged. All 263 individual articles, as well as the 84 issues of AnthroNotes, are also searchable through Google and the Smithsonian Collections Database (search term: AnthroNotes).

The digital AnthroNotes project was completed in the fall of 2015. The database is searchable by author, title, and year, as well as major subfields such as archaeology or linguistics. Searches may be conducted in over 40 topics including geographic regions (Africa, the Middle East, Asia); contemporary issues (refugees, forensics, genetics); and education (teaching activities, teaching resources, careers in anthropology).

In addition, Amazon carries both the paperback and the e-book version of the second, expanded edition of Anthropology Explored, The Best of Smithsonian AnthroNotes, which includes 36 AnthroNotes articles along with abstracts and recent author updates. The book’s chapters are divided into three sections: Investigating Our Origins and Variation, Examining Our Archaeological Past, and Exploring Our Many Cultures. Also available is a free online Instructors’ Guide.

Originally part of the NSF-funded George Washington University-Smithsonian Institution Anthropology for Teachers Program, AnthroNotes includes research-based articles by leading scholars in the field as well as classroom-tested activities. The publication received the Society for American Archaeology’s 2002 Award for Excellence in Public Education for “presenting archaeological and anthropological research to the public in an engaging and accessible style and for encouraging the study of these disciplines in classrooms across the nation.”

Throughout its history, AnthroNotes was published by the National Museum of Natural History’s Department of Anthropology. The museum’s Office of Education and Outreach has a website (Qrius) where you can find webcasts, online collections, and teaching resources, as well as a sign up for an e-newsletter. Visit the Q?rius website at Qrius.si.edu

The AnthroNotes editors: Alison S. Brooks, Carolyn Gecan, P. Ann Kaupp, Colleen Popson, and Ruth O. Selig