Fieldwork Funding Opportunity (Deadline February 15)

Here’s a great funding opportunity for linguistic and anthropological research in North, Central, and South America.  Canadian projects are accepted!


The Kinkade Language and Culture Fund (KLF) and the Jacobs Research Funds (JRF) provide support for projects involving fieldwork with living peoples of North, Central and South America which result in publication or other dissemination of information about the fieldwork. Priority is given to research on endangered cultures and languages, and to research on the Pacific Northwest. Projects focusing on archival research have low priority, but we welcome proposals to digitize, transcribe and translate old materials that might otherwise be lost or become inaccessible. Relevance of the project to contemporary theoretical issues in anthropology and linguistics is also a criterion used in evaluating proposals.

Funded projects typically focus on linguistic analysis, social-cultural anthropology, ethnolinguistics, or sociolinguistics. Especially appropriate are field studies that address cultural expressive systems, such as music, language, dance, mythology, world view, folk taxonomy, art, intellectual life, and religion. Also appropriate are projects focusing on cultural and linguistic forms in modern contexts, for example, traditional environmental knowledge or social organization.

Projects in archeology, physical anthropology, applied anthropology, and applied linguistics (for example, grants exclusively for technological improvements, development of pedagogical materials, etc.) are not eligible for support. It is expected that both the subjects of research and society in general will ultimately benefit from the knowledge generated by the funded research. The Jacobs Research Funds therefore do not support proprietary research for the exclusive use of any entity, public or private (such as national, state, provincial, or local governments; public or private charities, churches or foundations; tribes or bands; or community groups).

Grant categories:

  1. Individual Grants support research projects administered by a single investigator on a focused problem. The maximum award is $3000 USD or CAD.
  2. Group Grants support work by two or more researchers who will be cooperating on the same or similar projects. The maximum award is $6000 USD or CAD.
  3. The Kinkade Grants honor the memory of the late Dale Kinkade, a linguist known for his work on Salishan languages. Kinkade Grants support projects requiring an intense period of fieldwork, such as research leading to a major work such as a dictionary, collection of texts, etc. They are intended for experienced researchers, such as Ph.D. students working on dissertations, faculty with sabbatical or other period of course release, or retired professors seeking to complete major research. The maximum award is $9000 USD or CAD.

Application Procedure: see http://depts.washington.edu/jacobsf/apply.php

For any questions on the application process, please contact jacobsf@u.washington.edu

Deadline: All materials must be received by February 15th, 2018

CFP: Contingent Horizons

York University has a peer-reviewed student journal of anthropology, Contingent Horizons.  It is seeking scholarly and creative works of academic excellence by undergraduate and graduate students.  For its fourth volume, the theme is Public Anthropology.

Here’s your opportunity to get published or to serve as a peer reviewer.  From the promo, read on!!

1) Submissions (Theme: Public Anthropology) 

We are accepting submissions of original works that pertain to the discipline of anthropology, specifically relating to the issue’s theme of Public Anthropology.  Authors of works that relate to broader public concerns, as well the intersections between social justice and anthropological theory, are strongly encouraged to submit. Essays could address, for example: social movements, health and illness, politics, environmental concerns, identities, development and displacement, migration and movement, decolonization, knowledge systems, public affects, technoscience, art and aesthetics, and activism. Submissions can include but are not limited to: ethnographic research papers, literature reviews, photo essays, and creative writing.

We are also looking for students to write brief book reviews of current anthropological or ethnographic works relevant to public anthropology published between 2016-2017. Students of anthropology and related disciplines are encouraged to submit their work.

The deadline for submissions is Friday, October 13th, 2017. Please review the Contingent Horizons Submission Guidelines prior to submission.

2) Peer Reviewers:

We are recruiting both undergraduate and graduate students who are willing to act as peer reviewers between October 2017-April 2018. Each peer reviewer will be asked to provide substantial and constructive feedback about the content of a maximum of 1-2 submissions.

If you are interested in being a peer reviewer, please e-mail the Editorial Collective at contingenthorizons@gmail.com with the subject line “Peer Review.” Please include your institutional affiliation, degree program, year of study, and areas of scholarly interest.

For more information please visit Contingent Horizons and follow us on Twitter @continghorizons

AAA podcasts & more

If you are reading this message, then you presumably have an interest in anthropology.

Did you know that the American Anthropological Association (AAA) has a digital-only, public journal entitled, Open Anthropology?  “Each edition of Open Anthropology is made available free on the public Internet for a minimum of six months permitting any user to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search or link to the full text of the articles in each edition.” Image: Open book with Open AnthropologyAs well, AAA has a Podcast Library.  From the August AAA News & Notes:

Anthropod_icon.jpg In AnthroPod‘s latest episode, “Ethnography and Design 2: Swedish Design and Ethnocharrettes,” Keith Murphy discusses the anthropology of design through his work in Sweden as well as bringing design methodologies into anthropology. This is the second episode in a three-part series on ethnography and design. Listen to the first episode with Cassandra Hartblay here, and keep an eye out for the final episode with Lilly Irani in August.
StoryOfUs_icon.jpg
This Fall, the A Story of Us podcast hosts a series on Death. The graduate students at The Ohio State University discuss death from a variety of anthropological perspectives, from the smallest, individual level all the way up to extinction.
ThisAnthroLife_icon.jpg Ryan, Adam, and Aneil spend this episode of This Anthro Life exploring happiness through the lens of fetishism. They discuss Daniel Gilbert’s Stumbling on Happiness, the film Happy, and more! They seek to answer the following questions: What kinds of things make us happy? How does happiness inhere in objects and how do we use objects to display our happiness?
anthropological_airwaves_100.jpg Anthropological Airwaves is a podcast that explores the craft of anthropology in all of its forms. Building on American Anthropologist‘s commitment to four-field, multi-modal research, the podcast hosts conversations about anthropological projects—from fieldwork and publishing to the discipline’s role in public debates.
CIAMS.jpg RadioCIAMS probes critical debates in archaeology in conversation between leading practitioners and the next generation of researchers. The most recent episode, with NYU Abu Dhabi archaeologist Fiona Kidd discusses wall painting and elite iconography at the site of Akchakhan-kala in modern-day Uzbekistan.

Digital BC – BC Studies

You are studying in BC, which means you likely have written or digitally produced something related to this province.  Consider submitting something to BC Studies, a peer reviewed quarterly journal.

If you want to begin ‘small’, there’s Digital Postcards, which began accepting submissions in July on an ongoing basis.  Check out the gallery!  It includes videos and images from diverse locations of BC, categorized under Monuments and Photos of BC.

Send submissions to: info@bcstudies.com with Subject: Digital Postcard Submission.   Include your name and the location of the photo or video.

Story Gathering Project

A new project, Contact-No Contact, supervised by Randy Fred of Nanaimo with Geist magazine and funded by the Canada Council for the Arts’ New Chapter: 2017 and Beyond, offers you the opportunity to share a personal story.

From the project website:

Contact No Contact is a gathering of personal contact narratives created by writers and storytellers. We have collected stories—short narratives in writing and on video—on the subject of contact: how contact appears in our lives and our memories and how we encounter our own culture as well as the culture of others.

Contact No Contact is designed to welcome Canadians into a conversation that they might otherwise feel excluded from, by considering “how Contact started” (or failed to start) in their own lives, and then how it went on from there—that is, how did “Further Contact” emerge or fail to emerge in their lives?

Don’t be shy!  If you have something to say, submit your story.  I have.

SDG Bootcamp

Image: SDG BootcampThis is a hands-on program for youth between the ages of 18 and 24.  If you have the desire to engage in UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), this may be the opportunity for you.

From the promo blurb: “SDG Bootcamp will run from October 4th, 2017 to the end of February 2018. The program will consist of an introduction into the SDGs, which will be held on October 4th and 5th. Following that, there will be a 5-day road trip, from October 20th – 25th, to the Calgary SDG Symposium, ‘Together 2017‘. Between November and February participants will use their newly honed skills and knowledge to organize and hold their own community engagement activities. The minimum time commitment for the course will be approximately 10 days over the 5 month period.

Want to learn more?  Go to: http://bccic.ca/the-sustainable-development-goals-engagement-program/

Canada Graduate Scholarships – Master’s Program

Thinking about funding your graduate school program? Read on…


This will be of particular interest to 4th year and post-degree students as well as those already enrolled in a master’s program with a significant research component. Eligible students must have achieved a first class average (A-, 3.67/4.33) in each of the last two years of completed study (FTE). While VIU has an award allocation of 3 (2 social sciences; 1 natural sciences), student can apply to up to 5 institutions with an allocation.

The competition for Canada Graduate Scholarship Masters’ (CGS-M) research training awards $17,500 for all topics of research at the master’s level. The Federal agencies supporting these awards are:

  • NSERC – Natural Science and Engineering Research Council of Canada
  • SSHRC – Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada
  • CIHR – Canadian Institutes of Health Research

The objective of this funding program is to help develop research skills and assist in the training of highly qualified personnel by supporting students who demonstrate a high standard of achievement in undergraduate and early graduate studies.

The competition is open to prospective masters students and masters students who started their program in 2016 and will have at least 12 months of study remaining in their program as of May 1, 2017.

To be eligible to apply, you must:

  • be a Canadian citizen or a permanent resident of Canada;
  • be enrolled in, have applied for, or will apply for full-time admission to an eligible master’s program at a Canadian institution with a CGS-M allocation;
  • have completed, as of December 31, 2016, between zero and 12 months of full-time studies in the master’s program for which you are requesting funding;
  • have achieved a first-class average in each of the last two years of study [at VIU that’s a minimum “A-“, or 3.67/4.33].

Vancouver Island University has been provided a quota of awards from NSERC and SSHRC (VIU does not currently have a CIHR quota). VIU holds the competition to determine which VIU students will receive these awards. The award allocations are:

Funding Agency Research Type VIU’s Award Allocation
NSERC natural science and engineering 1
SSHRC social science and humanities 2

Application deadline: December 1, 2016

The application form and full instructions can be found on the funding program webpage. Also check the VIU website for information specific to VIU’s competition.

If you still have questions, contact Shelley Lumsden, Research Services Manager

CASCA: Richard F Salisbury Award

APPLICATION INFORMATION

Eligibility: Applications can be made by any student member of CASCA undertaking doctoral level research in the field of anthropology at a Canadian university. Preference will be given to those who have completed their comprehensive examinations, have approved thesis proposals and are within one year of beginning fieldwork. CASCA recognizes that some eligible candidates may not be studying in anthropology programs, however all candidates must be members of CASCA when making their applications. The intent of the award is to assist with fieldwork expenses.

Criteria: An outstanding academic record and an excellent research proposal with innovative scholarly import and social relevance.

Value: $2000

Deadline: All application materials must be submitted electronically by 1 February 2017 to: Pauline McKenzie Aucoin – CASCA Secretary, rpaucoin@aol.com

CASCA news: New undergrad membership category

CASCA has introduced a new undergraduate student membership category (ony $25 annually). Membership comes with online access to Anthropologica and undergraduate members are eligible to participate in the annual conference. CASCA student members are added to the member list and receive regular updates on Canadian Anthropology community activities, news and opportunities and can participate actively in CASCA surveys and votes.

A student zone page on the CASCA website.  Don’t hesitate to send CASCA student news and opportunities (membership@anthropologica.ca).

View online – “Why join CASCA” and membership fee categories.