SoSc Grad Info Night, Nov 12

The Sociology Students’ Union is organizing a Social Sciences Graduate Information Night.

WHEN: November 12 from 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM.
WHERE: Building 355, Room 211 (the lounge), Nanaimo campus.

The event is multidisciplinary with faculty representation from SoSc departments.

Pizza will be available from 5:30 PM and participants will be seated for the event to begin at 6:00 PM. Introductions (5-minutes each) by various instructors will include mention of credentials, graduate and work experience, etc.

‘Heritage Basics’ Presentation, Oct 15

Students may find this of interest as contacts and information may open up future opportunities.

As part of the City of Nanaimo’s Heritage Conservation Program review and update, Heritage BC will be providing a FREE two-hour public presentation entitled “Heritage Basics”.

WHEN: Thursday, October 15, from 7:00 to 9:00 pm
WHERE: Nanaimo Museum (100 Museum Way)

The presentation will introduce the basic legislative overview of heritage conservation for local governments in BC, introduce values based management for heritage conservation and planning, the benefits of heritage conservation (social, environmental, economic), and the intersections between heritage conservation and sustainability. Participants will gain an understanding of values centred heritage conservation, including benefits, challenges, opportunities and possible next steps for Nanaimo. No heritage background is necessary.

Hosted by the City’s Culture and Heritage Department, this workshop is free and open to the public. No RSVP necessary.


What is Heritage BC?
Heritage BC is a province-wide, not-for-profit, charitable organization supporting heritage conservation across British Columbia through education, training and skills development, capacity building in heritage planning and funding through the Heritage Legacy Fund. HBC is passionate about building links between heritage conservation and tourism, economic and environmental sustainability, community pride and an appreciation of our common history.

Why is the City looking to update and review its Heritage Conservation Program?
The Nanaimo Heritage Strategy was completed in 1994, and in 1998 a Heritage Action Plan was developed. It remains important to periodically review and update this plan to reflect the City’s current priorities while identifying future opportunities. This Fall represents the third review of the plan (now known as the Heritage Conservation Program). The review reflects the approaches and commitments made through the 2014-2020 Cultural Plan for a Creative Nanaimo to engage the community with its culture and heritage in various ways to ensure currently identified priorities and partners are still relevant and to identify areas where we can work better and / or differently with our partners and the community.

  • What do you value most about Nanaimo’s heritage?
  • How could the City better connect “culture” and “heritage”?
  • In your opinion, are there any policy or action improvements that would strengthen the current Heritage Conservation Program, or expand its scope? If so, what are they?
  • Could the City improve the way it celebrates, remembers or promotes Nanaimo’s heritage? If so, how?

You are encouraged to share your comments (at the October 15 workshop and / or through a short online survey). The results of the public input will be presented to City Council in the form of a summary report on the status of the program and recommendations on how best to integrate the program with the policy objectives of the Cultural Plan.

If you have any questions, please contact:

CITY OF NANAIMO
CULTURE AND HERITAGE DEPARTMENT

Phone: 250-755-4483
Email: cultureandheritage@nanaimo.ca
Office: Service & Resource Centre, 411 Dunsmuir Street
Mailing: 455 Wallace Street, Nanaimo BC, V9R 5J6

Master’s Award Competition & Information Sessions

The objective of the Canada Graduate Scholarships-Master’s (CGS M) Program is to help develop research skills and assist in the training of highly qualified personnel by supporting students who demonstrate a high standard of achievement in undergraduate and early graduate studies.

To be eligible to apply, applicants must be a Canadian citizen or permanent resident of Canada and have achieved an A- (3.67) average in each of their last two completed years of study. Furthermore, an eligible graduate program must have a significant research component (original, autonomous research that leads to the completion of a thesis, major research project, dissertation, scholarly publication, performance, recital and/or exhibit). Specific eligibility details will be discussed at the information sessions (see below) and can be found on the CGS-M web page.

Eligible Canadian universities receive agency-specific allocations based on the 2,500 Canada Graduate Scholarships-Master’s (CGS M) awards available each year. There are 400 CGS M awards available from the Canadian Institutes for Health Research (CIHR), 800 from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) and 1,300 from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC). Award decisions will be made at the institutions that applicants list on their application. VIU will be awarding one SSHRC CGS-M. University allocations can be found on the Canada Graduate Scholarships-Master’s Award Allocations web page.

The application deadline is December 1, 2014.

Students interested in applying should register for a Canada Graduate Scholarship – Master’s Information Session by e-mailing  kathryn.jepson@viu.ca

At these sessions students will learn about:

  • The agencies;
  • The CGS-M competition;
  • How to apply and prepare an application;
  • The evaluation and selection process; and
  • updates and changes to the program.

SSHRC Canada Graduate Scholarship Master’s Information Session:
Wednesday, September 17th 12:30pm-1:30pm; or 
Tuesday, September 23rd 1:00pm-2:00pm

NSERC Canada Graduate Scholarship Master’s Information Sessions: 
Thursday, September 18th 12:30pm to 1:30pm; or 
Monday, September 22nd 1:00pm-2:00pm

CIHR Canada Graduate Scholarship Master’s Information Sessions:
Friday, September 19th 12:30pm-1:30pm; or 
Wednesday, September 24th 1:00pm-2:00pm

Kathryn Jepson is in the RSA Office to help you! Students with questions pertaining to the Canada Graduate Scholarship – Master’s award program, should contact Kathryn. Second or third year students, who are keen to learn how to  prepare for these scholarships, should also see Kathryn.

BC Archaeology Forum 2014 – Nanaimo

SAVE THE DATE

British Columbia Archaeology Forum
Saturday, October 18th, 2014
Nanaimo, BC

We are pleased to announce that the 2014 British Columbia Archaeology Forum will be hosted by Vancouver Island University in the territory of the Snuneymuxw First Nation in Nanaimo, BC, this coming October.

A reception will be held on the evening of Friday, October 17th, with Saturday the 18th reserved for a full day of speakers and presentations followed by an evening event, and optional Sunday excursions in the local area.

We are currently consulting with downtown hotels about the event and securing discounted rooms for forum participants; more information on this will be provided asap.

In the meantime, save the date — Saturday, October 18th, 2014 — and we’ll be in touch soon!

Cheers,
2014 Forum Organizers
archforum2014@gmail.com

Reminder! Guest Lecture by Daryl Fedje: Sea Levels and Archaeology on the Northwest Coast

The VIU Department of Anthropology and Anthropology Student Club are pleased to present a free public lecture by

Daryl Fedje

Department of Anthropology, University of Victoria

Sea Levels and Archaeology on the Northwest Coast

The early archaeological record on the BC coast is poorly known, partly as a consequence of relative sea level change. Sea level history varies considerably along the coast with early shorelines having shifted rapidly during early post-glacial to early Holocene time. On parts of the coast early shorelines are now drowned up to 150 m while in other parts they are stranded 150 m or more above modern levels. By developing regional sea level histories, archaeologists are now able to design investigations to locate archaeological sites dating to this early time.

Daryl Fedje’s research interests are focused on Quaternary paleoecology and the early human history of the Pacific Northwest Coast.

Where: VIU Nanaimo campus, Building 356, Lecture Hall 109

When: Tuesday January 28, 2014, 11:30 AM – 12:50 PM

EVERYONE WELCOME!

Daryl Fedje VIU ANTH Talk

Gail Anderson @ VIU, Nanaimo – Dec 3

Maggot Tales

Forensic entomology is the study of insects, their life cycles, and their succession on decomposing bodies. Dr. Anderson will discuss how insects can be used to determine time since death and to pinpoint the location of wounds in human and animal crime scene investigations.

Gail Anderson, forensic entomologist extraordinaire, will be speaking at the Nanaimo Campus of Vancouver Island University, Tuesday, December 3. There will be two presentations: 1:30-3:00pm, and 3:00-4:30pm; both will be held in Building 356, Room 109.

Don’t miss this opportunity!  Free and open to all!

Talk at ASBC Nanaimo by David Hopwood

David Hopwood Lecture Click for details

Date: Saturday November 16 3:30-5
Location: Nanaimo District Museum
Cost $2
ASBC Members Free!

David will be speaking on the work that has been conducted on the archaeological site Kenan Tepe in Souteastern Turkey. In particular the talk will focus on the multiple burials uncovered over three time periods represented at the site. Burial practice patterns provides insight into how individuals and communities negotiated their relationships between the living and the dead. Several infant and adult burials from the multi-period mound site of Kenan Tepe were analysed to examine the variety of burial practices carried out and to address questions regarding the nature of the relationship between the Kenan Tepe residents and their dead. During the time of occupation at Kenan Tepe at least three different methods of interment were practiced, progressively indicating a shift towards a less intimate relationship with the dead.

Multicultural Speakers Series – month of October

A number of the speakers are VIU students so here’s your opportunity to support peers; one of our own is among the first scheduled!

The Multicultural Speaker Series
Starting October 2, 2013

Stereotypes, racist comments, negative headlines in media about various countries, can leave people who have immigrated here viewed through a single lens. The Multicultural Speaker Series, a partnership of Central Vancouver Island Multicultural Society and the City of Nanaimo, aims to widen the lens through which we view other countries, and immigrants in Nanaimo, many of whom are our neighbours.

This free speaker series, open to the public, will take place over four Wednesday Nights in October (Oct 2nd, 9th, 16th and 23rd) from 6:30pm to 8:00pm at the Rugby Clubhouse, 6700 Dover Road.

Each night two guest speakers from different parts of the world including: Iraq, Israel, China, Sudan and Ethiopia will take the stage to share information and experiences about their country of origin. Each evening will also have a different guest MC who will introduce the speakers and ask questions, including: David Stanley, the author of numerous travel guidebooks (Lonely Planet and Moon Handbooks), Kait Burgan, host of daily magazine show, Go! Island and Katrin Roth Von Szepesbéla Director, Human Rights and Respectful Workplace at VIU.

“This is a wonderful opportunity for us to better understand our neighbours, develop respectful relationships and reduce discrimination” says Samantha Letourneau, Diversity Coordinator at the Multicultural Society.

John Horn, Social Planner with the City of Nanaimo, believes that a successful city must include healthy relationships between all residents

To learn more about the IMMIGRANT WELCOME CENTRE and our many services for new immigrants and the community please call, visit or browse our website!

Multicultural Speaker Series Poster 
Updated list of speakers can be found online.

W5 of Academic Research

The Research and Scholarly Activity Office is launching a NEW lunchtime research discussion series at VIU called: “The W5 of Academic Research: Research Who, Research What, Research Where, Research When, Research Why, (and Research How)”

Are you curious to know more about different academic research theories, methodologies and methods? Are you teaching research methods or supervising student research and would like to connect with others to gather examples/resources to share in the classroom? Are you interested in potential interdisciplinary research collaboration and would like to know more about who is doing what research here at VIU?

This new series will take place every other Friday (and a few extras besides), beginning on Friday September 27, from 12-1pm. Most events will take place in the ICR Lounge (305/4th Floor). A few will happen on the Cowichan Campus.

Next event will be Friday October 11: Warren Weir, Respectful research with Aboriginal communities and institutions

Check VIU’s Research & Scholarly Activity Events & Workshops webpage for updates.

Everyone welcome
Refreshments will be served

UNLEARN, REWILD: A Talk by Miles Olson

The Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies presents:

UNLEARN, REWILD: A Talk by Miles Olson

Thursday, Oct. 24th, 4:00-5:20pm
Building 355, Room 211 (Lounge)

Free event; all are welcome

What separates us from the rest of the natural world? Why is it that everything on this planet exists in a state of balance and synergy, with the exclusion of us? More importantly, how do we transform that? How do we rewild our minds, unlearn the conditioning, patterns and beliefs that lie at the root of our disconnect from self, others and the living world? Miles Olson uses personal stories and experiences as a springboard into these and other big questions.

Miles Olson has spent the past decade living off the grid, on the forested edge of a sprawling small city on Vancouver Island. During this time he has built a ‘feral homestead’ as a squatter, foraging, hunting, gardening and scavenging among a group of like-minded individuals dedicated to living close to the land, in alignment with their deepest values and truth. Olson’s decade long experiment in deep green simplicity has given him an extensive toolkit of traditional living skills, along with a truly unique and fascinating perspective on the relationship between the human and nonhuman worlds, sustainability, freedom, ecology, and the human experience. Olson is the author of Unlearn, Rewild: Earth skills, ideas and inspiration for the future primitive (2012, New Society Publishers). He has spoken to groups internationally about his journey and revelations.

For more information on this event, contact Dr. Carolyn Swanson at Carolyn.Swanson@viu.ca or 250-753-3245, extension 2140.