NYT Op-Ed: Writing Tips

The August 25, 2017 op-ed columnist, Bret Stephens, offered an article entitled, Tips for Aspiring Op-Ed Writers.  There are 15 tips worth considering.

A few to pay attention to when writing:

  • “every sentence has to count in grabbing the reader’s attention, starting with the first”
  • “Authority matters.”
  • “Avoid the passive voice.”
  • “Keep your sentences short and your paragraphs tight.”
  • “Kill the clichés.”

AAA podcasts & more

If you are reading this message, then you presumably have an interest in anthropology.

Did you know that the American Anthropological Association (AAA) has a digital-only, public journal entitled, Open Anthropology?  “Each edition of Open Anthropology is made available free on the public Internet for a minimum of six months permitting any user to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search or link to the full text of the articles in each edition.” Image: Open book with Open AnthropologyAs well, AAA has a Podcast Library.  From the August AAA News & Notes:

Anthropod_icon.jpg In AnthroPod‘s latest episode, “Ethnography and Design 2: Swedish Design and Ethnocharrettes,” Keith Murphy discusses the anthropology of design through his work in Sweden as well as bringing design methodologies into anthropology. This is the second episode in a three-part series on ethnography and design. Listen to the first episode with Cassandra Hartblay here, and keep an eye out for the final episode with Lilly Irani in August.
StoryOfUs_icon.jpg
This Fall, the A Story of Us podcast hosts a series on Death. The graduate students at The Ohio State University discuss death from a variety of anthropological perspectives, from the smallest, individual level all the way up to extinction.
ThisAnthroLife_icon.jpg Ryan, Adam, and Aneil spend this episode of This Anthro Life exploring happiness through the lens of fetishism. They discuss Daniel Gilbert’s Stumbling on Happiness, the film Happy, and more! They seek to answer the following questions: What kinds of things make us happy? How does happiness inhere in objects and how do we use objects to display our happiness?
anthropological_airwaves_100.jpg Anthropological Airwaves is a podcast that explores the craft of anthropology in all of its forms. Building on American Anthropologist‘s commitment to four-field, multi-modal research, the podcast hosts conversations about anthropological projects—from fieldwork and publishing to the discipline’s role in public debates.
CIAMS.jpg RadioCIAMS probes critical debates in archaeology in conversation between leading practitioners and the next generation of researchers. The most recent episode, with NYU Abu Dhabi archaeologist Fiona Kidd discusses wall painting and elite iconography at the site of Akchakhan-kala in modern-day Uzbekistan.

Women’s Human Rights Education Institute

If you are interested in becoming a Human Rights educator, looking into the International Human Rights Training Programs offered by the Women’s Human Rights Education Institute might be a next step for you.

From its webpage: “The Women’s Human Rights Institute helps participants develop a practical understanding of the UN Human Rights system and learn how to apply a women’s human rights framework to a multiplicity of issues. Participants will develop practical facilitation skills to help them become human rights educators in their own regions and organizations.”

CASCA news: New undergrad membership category

CASCA has introduced a new undergraduate student membership category (ony $25 annually). Membership comes with online access to Anthropologica and undergraduate members are eligible to participate in the annual conference. CASCA student members are added to the member list and receive regular updates on Canadian Anthropology community activities, news and opportunities and can participate actively in CASCA surveys and votes.

A student zone page on the CASCA website.  Don’t hesitate to send CASCA student news and opportunities (membership@anthropologica.ca).

View online – “Why join CASCA” and membership fee categories.

BEADS articles on Academia.edu and SURFACE

To all those interested in beads and/or beadwork, a batch of articles from BEADS: Journal of the Society of Bead Researchers has been uploaded to Academia.edu. All articles in Volumes 1-17 have been uploaded to the site.

Visit: https://independent.academia.edu/KarlisKarklins

As well, volumes 1-6 have been uploaded to the Syracuse University SURFACE site.

The Society of Bead Researchers is a non-profit scientific-educational corporation founded in 1981 to foster historical, archaeological, and material cultural research on beads and beadwork of all materials and periods, and to expedite the dissemination of the resultant knowledge.

New student resource – FREE!!

Here’s info courtesy of UBC Press.  It’s a freebie!!

UBC Press is excited to offer a new student resource, How to Succeed at University (and Get a Great Job): Mastering the Critical Skills You Need for School, Work, and Life, FREE for download at www.ubcpress.ca/oncampus.

In this lively, highly accessible guide, York University Professors Thomas R. Klassen and John A. Dwyer answer the questions students have about succeeding in their courses and their post-secondary careers. They argue that the best preparation for success in life and on the job are by mastering the skills needed at university. This book will help students:

  • Develop strong communication skills (writing, speaking, and listening)
  • Select their courses and choose a program
  • Organize and manage their time
  • Sharpen their critical thinking skills
  • Write good essays and prepare for exams
  • Take better notes in class
  • Become an active reader and listener

The book is also available in print.

AnthroNotes Digital Project – database

News for the editors of AnthroNotes:

AnthroNotes Editors Launch Searchable, Downloadable Digital Database

Interested in ancient Egypt, Native Americans, Arctic climate change, or archaeology? Thanks to a joint effort of the Smithsonian’s Department of Anthropology and Smithsonian Libraries, anyone now can download in-depth, research-based essays and classroom tested teaching activities on a wide range of topics through the AnthroNotes digital database.

The entire collection of 84 issues of AnthroNotes (1979-2012) and 263 selected individual AnthroNotes articles, each with a new abstract, can be downloaded from the Smithsonian Libraries’ Official Digital Repository. Individual articles are offered in three formats, designed for computers (PDF), mobile devices (mobi), and e-readers (E-Pub). Articles are free of copyright restrictions; photocopying for classroom use is permitted and encouraged. All 263 individual articles, as well as the 84 issues of AnthroNotes, are also searchable through Google and the Smithsonian Collections Database (search term: AnthroNotes).

The digital AnthroNotes project was completed in the fall of 2015. The database is searchable by author, title, and year, as well as major subfields such as archaeology or linguistics. Searches may be conducted in over 40 topics including geographic regions (Africa, the Middle East, Asia); contemporary issues (refugees, forensics, genetics); and education (teaching activities, teaching resources, careers in anthropology).

In addition, Amazon carries both the paperback and the e-book version of the second, expanded edition of Anthropology Explored, The Best of Smithsonian AnthroNotes, which includes 36 AnthroNotes articles along with abstracts and recent author updates. The book’s chapters are divided into three sections: Investigating Our Origins and Variation, Examining Our Archaeological Past, and Exploring Our Many Cultures. Also available is a free online Instructors’ Guide.

Originally part of the NSF-funded George Washington University-Smithsonian Institution Anthropology for Teachers Program, AnthroNotes includes research-based articles by leading scholars in the field as well as classroom-tested activities. The publication received the Society for American Archaeology’s 2002 Award for Excellence in Public Education for “presenting archaeological and anthropological research to the public in an engaging and accessible style and for encouraging the study of these disciplines in classrooms across the nation.”

Throughout its history, AnthroNotes was published by the National Museum of Natural History’s Department of Anthropology. The museum’s Office of Education and Outreach has a website (Qrius) where you can find webcasts, online collections, and teaching resources, as well as a sign up for an e-newsletter. Visit the Q?rius website at Qrius.si.edu

The AnthroNotes editors: Alison S. Brooks, Carolyn Gecan, P. Ann Kaupp, Colleen Popson, and Ruth O. Selig

Online resources available

For those interested in the cultural and historical aspects of beads around the world and do not have access to BEADS: Journal of the Society of Bead Researchers, the articles in Volumes 1-5 have been uploaded to the academia.edu website. More will follow in the coming year. Just go to https://independent.academia.edu/KKarklins and you will see the list of all the uploaded journal articles as well as a few other bead (and other) studies by Karlis Karklins and others.

If you are interested in embossed and stamped glass bottles, check out Chapter 1 of BOTTLED IN ILLINOIS 1840-1880: Embossed Bottled and Bottled Products of Early Illinois Merchants from Chicago to Cairo.  Go to: https://www.academia.edu/18162915/BOTTLED_IN_ILLINOIS_1840-1880._Illinois_State_Archaeological_Survey._2011_792_pp_CHAPTER_1

Another resource on glass is the web reference library compiled and created by Ian Macky.  Included are glass artefact catalogs, brochures, etc. as pdfs.  The earliest document is from 1615, with others extending to 1951.