Aspirations to be the next John Marshall or Tim Asch?

If you don’t recognise the names, John Marshall or Tim Asch, then it’s time to take a look at some classic anthropological films, such as The Hunters (1957) or N!ai: The Story of a !Kung Woman (1980), and The Feast (1969) or The Ax Fight (1975).  Marshall and Asch directed and produced these documentaries.

If you are interested in becoming an anthropological fillmmaker, test your acumen by entering The Archaeology Channel (TAC) International Film and Video Festival.  Read the guidelines carefully!!  For TAC’s last Festival, they received 95 entries from 22 countries.

Deadline for receipt of entries: October 15, 2015.  Don’t wait to the last week to enter.

Attend the four-day festival of juried films and videos on archaeological and indigenous topics, May 12-15, 2016, at the Eugene Hilton and Conference Center in Eugene, OR.

The World’s Beads: An Annotated Bibliography

A much-expanded version of the Researching the World’s Beads: An Annotated Bibliography has been uploaded to the Society of Bead Researchers website. Several hundred new references have been added with the hope that the bibliography will be of use to those researching beads. The emphasis is on archaeological material but some ethnographic references are also provided.

The bibliography has been divided into nine major political-geographical groups, two specialized theme groups, and a general/miscellaneous group.  These are in the form of PDFs.

This bibliography has been compiled by Karlis Karklins; revised and updated 28 March 2014.

Canadian Conservation Institute – publications & more

The Canadian Conservation Institute (CCI) just announced that their back catalogue of technical publications has been released online for free.  New CCI Technical Bulletins will continue to be sold, for a period of five years, on a partial cost recovery basis. After that time, they will also be made available for free.

This is a rich resource of specialised technical information for those working with collections, whether for museums or archaeological projects:

CCI Notes http://www.cci-icc.gc.ca/publications/notes/index-eng.aspx

CCI Technical Bulletins http://www.cci-icc.gc.ca/publications/category-categorie-eng.aspx?id=18

CCI Symposia and Colloquia Publications http://www.cci-icc.gc.ca/publications/category-categorie-eng.aspx?id=19

For those interested in conservation, the Canadian Conservation Institute (CCI) offers Paid Post-graduate Internships and Curriculum Internships that provide learning opportunities for the conservation community in Canada and abroad.

NPS Archeology Program Posts Webinars

The NPS Archeology Program has posted on their public website the webinars from a series the program hosted in Fall 2013-Winter 2014. The lecture series was devoted to dissemination of information about developments in archeological site locational technologies including LiDAR, metal detecting, ground penetrating radar, satellite imagery, and underwater locational technologies. The posted webinars are:

A Short History of Technological Innovations in Geo-spatial
Methods in Archeology — Fred Limp, Leica Chair in Geospatial Imaging, Dept. of Geosciences, University of Arkansas

Metal Detecting for Archeologists: Recent Advances in Methods
and Equipment — Douglas Scott, NPS Archeologist (retired)

Geophysical Prospecting in Archeology — Kenneth L. Kvamme, Director, Archeo-Imaging Lab, University of Arkansas

Capturing Cultural Landscapes: GIS and Historical Imagery at
Voyageurs National Park — Andrew LaBounty, Integrated Resources Technician, Voyageurs NP

Direct Predictive Modeling of Regional Archaeological Phenomena
with Satellites — Alan P. Sullivan, Chair, Department of Anthropology, University of Cincinnati

Heritage Preservation and 3D Immersive Learning Using Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) and Combined Spatial, Imaging, and Visualization Tools — Lori Collins and Travis Doering, Alliance for Integrated Spatial Technologies, University of South Florida, School of Geosciences

Advancing Archeology in the Midwest Region through GIS: Information Management, Modeling, and Analysis — Anne Vawser and Amanda Davey Renner, NPS Midwest Archeological Center

Business in Great Waters: A Review and Assessment of Marine
Archeological Remote Sensing Techniques and Technology — Dave Conlin, NPS and James Delgado, NOAA

To view the webinars, go to http://www.nps.gov/archeology/tools/webinars.htm

NPS 2014 archeological prospection workshop

The workshop is open to all archeologists and students, as well as, those folks interested in forensic, law enforcement, and cemetery investigations.

The National Park Service’s 2014 workshop on archaeological prospection techniques entitled Current Archaeological Prospection Advances for Non-Destructive Investigations in the 21st Century will be held May 19-23, 2014, at *Aztalan State Park* in Jefferson County, Wisconsin.

Lodging and lectures will be at the Comfort Suites in Johnson Creek, Wisconsin. The field exercises will take place at Aztalan State Park.

Aztalan State Park is a National Historic Landmark and contains one of Wisconsin’s most important archaeological sites. It showcases an ancient Middle-Mississippian village that thrived between A.D. 1000 and 1300. The people who settled Aztalan built large, flat-topped pyramidal mounds and a stockade around their village. Portions of the stockade and two mounds have been reconstructed in the park. Co-sponsors for the workshop include the National Park Service’s Midwest Archeological Center, the Aztalan State Park, and the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources. This will be the twenty-fourth year of the workshop dedicated to the use of geophysical, aerial photography, and other remote sensing methods as they apply to the identification, evaluation, conservation, and protection of archaeological resources across this Nation. The workshop will present lectures on the theory of operation, methodology, processing, and interpretation with on-hands use of the equipment in the field. There is a registration charge of $475.00. Application forms are available on the Midwest Archeological Center’s web page at <http://www.cr.nps.gov/mwac/>.

For further information, please contact Steven L. DeVore, Archeologist, National Park Service, Midwest Archeological Center, Federal Building, Room 474, 100 Centennial Mall North, Lincoln, Nebraska 68508-3873: tel: (402) 437-5392, ext. 141; fax: (402) 437-5098; email: <steve_de_vore@nps.gov>.

Technology Week on the SHA Blog

If you wondered how technology can aid the archaeologist, especially in mortuary studies, you will be interested in the following papers found at www.sha.org/blog.  Here on the Island, there is a need for ground penetrating radar to “map” a number of cemeteries that were part of Japanese Canadian communities.  Many were desecrated during WWII, with headstones knocked over and pushed aside.  The location of grave sites is now “lost”; the cemetery in Cumberland is certainly an example (see below).

Cumberland Japanese Cemetery

Cumberland Japanese Cemetery. Remaining gravestones were grouped as a monument in 1967.

It’s Technology Week on the SHA blog, and this week’s theme is Technology in Mortuary Analysis. Duane Quates, the organizer of the Tech Week, is the author of the first post, Understanding Cemeteries through Technical Applications: An example from Fort Drum, NY, followed by Katy Meyers’ post (Examining Space of a Resting Place: GIS of a New York Cemetery) discussing the use of GIS in Mortuary Analysis. Michael Heilen’s post (Application of Advanced Technologies in the Excavation, Analysis, Consultation, and Reburial: The Alameda-Stone Cemetery in Tucson, Arizona) is about the use of technology in the Alameda-Stone Cemetery in Tucson, Arizona. The final post is authored by Michael Sprowles, (Mortuary Analytics on US Army Garrison, Fort Drum, NY), and deals with the use of ground penetrating radar and other technology to record cemeteries.