Fieldwork Funding Opportunity – Jacobs Research Funds

The Jacobs Research Funds (JRF) funds projects involving fieldwork with living peoples of North, Central and South America which result in publication or other dissemination of information about the fieldwork. Priority is given to research on endangered cultures and languages, and to research on the Pacific Northwest. Projects focusing on archival research have low priority, but we welcome proposals to digitize, transcribe and translate old materials that might otherwise be lost or become inaccessible. Relevance of the project to contemporary theoretical issues in anthropology and linguistics is also a criterion used in evaluating proposals.

Funded projects typically focus on linguistic analysis, social-cultural anthropology, ethnolinguistics, or sociolinguistics. Especially appropriate are field studies that address cultural expressive systems, such as music, language, dance, mythology, world view, folk taxonomy, art, intellectual life, and religion. Also appropriate are projects focusing on cultural and linguistic forms in modern contexts, for example, traditional environmental knowledge or social organization.

Projects in archeology, physical anthropology, applied anthropology, and applied linguistics (for example, grants exclusively for technological improvements, development of pedagogical materials, etc.) are not eligible for support. It is expected that both the subjects of research and society in general will ultimately benefit from the knowledge generated by the funded research. The Jacobs Research Funds therefore do not support proprietary research for the exclusive use of any entity, public or private (such as national, state, provincial, or local governments; public or private charities, churches or foundations; tribes or bands; or community groups).

Grant categories
1. Individual Grants support research projects administered by a single investigator on a focused problem. The maximum award is $3000 USD or CAD.
2. Group Grants support work by two or more researchers who will be cooperating on the same or similar projects. The maximum award is $6000 USD or CAD.
3. The Kinkade Grants honour the memory of the late Dale Kinkade, a linguist known for his work on Salishan languages. Kinkade Grants support projects requiring an intense period of fieldwork, such as research leading to a major work such as a dictionary, collection of texts, etc. They are intended for experienced researchers, such as Ph.D. students working on dissertations, faculty with sabbatical or other period of course release, or retired professors seeking to complete major research. The maximum award is $9000 USD or CAD.

Grant recipients based in Canada will be funded in Canadian dollars through the Whatcom Museum Society British Columbia.

Application Procedure
Please see: https://depts.washington.edu/jacobsf/application.html

For any questions on the application process, please contact jgrant@cob.org

Deadline: All materials must be received by February 15th, 2016

Commonwealth Scholarship – India

Here’s a great opportunity for an upper-level undergraduate!  Note that the deadline is December 21, 2015.


The Indian Council for Cultural Relations (ICCR) has launched its scholarship competition under the prestigious Commonwealth Scholarship Plan 2016-2017. Two scholarships are available to Canadians who wish to study or conduct research in India. The scholarships, which are tenable as of September 2016, provide funding for the full length of academic programs in India at the undergraduate, Master’s or PhD levels. The scholarship for PhD scholars may be renewed for a maximum of five and a half years.

The deadline to apply is December 21, 2015. Please visit  Commonwealth Scholarship Plan – India for full program details.

The Commonwealth Scholarship and Fellowship Plan (CSFP) was established in 1959, with the first scholars selected in 1960. The goal of the Plan is to nurture educational links among Commonwealth countries and to strengthen the ideals upon which the Commonwealth was founded. Over 27,000 Commonwealth citizens have held awards – many going on to reach the very highest levels within their profession.

Online resources available

For those interested in the cultural and historical aspects of beads around the world and do not have access to BEADS: Journal of the Society of Bead Researchers, the articles in Volumes 1-5 have been uploaded to the academia.edu website. More will follow in the coming year. Just go to https://independent.academia.edu/KKarklins and you will see the list of all the uploaded journal articles as well as a few other bead (and other) studies by Karlis Karklins and others.

If you are interested in embossed and stamped glass bottles, check out Chapter 1 of BOTTLED IN ILLINOIS 1840-1880: Embossed Bottled and Bottled Products of Early Illinois Merchants from Chicago to Cairo.  Go to: https://www.academia.edu/18162915/BOTTLED_IN_ILLINOIS_1840-1880._Illinois_State_Archaeological_Survey._2011_792_pp_CHAPTER_1

Another resource on glass is the web reference library compiled and created by Ian Macky.  Included are glass artefact catalogs, brochures, etc. as pdfs.  The earliest document is from 1615, with others extending to 1951.

SoSc Grad Info Night, Nov 12

The Sociology Students’ Union is organizing a Social Sciences Graduate Information Night.

WHEN: November 12 from 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM.
WHERE: Building 355, Room 211 (the lounge), Nanaimo campus.

The event is multidisciplinary with faculty representation from SoSc departments.

Pizza will be available from 5:30 PM and participants will be seated for the event to begin at 6:00 PM. Introductions (5-minutes each) by various instructors will include mention of credentials, graduate and work experience, etc.

SfAA Student Awards

The Society of Applied Anthropology is meeting almost in our backyard in 2016; it’s in Vancouver at the Westin Bayshore, March 29-April 2.  The theme is Intersections.

There is a student rate, as well as, a number of awards to assist with travel.  Also worth considering is submitting a paper and/or poster for one of the various prizes offered.  See: http://www.sfaa.net/annual-meeting/student-travel-awards/

Here’s a SfAA Awards pdf poster.

Queen’s Young Leader Award

Are you between the ages of 18 and 29? Do you take the lead in transforming lives within your community? If you answered in the affirmative to both these questions, then consider applying for the Queen’s Young Leader Award. Read on.

The Queen’s Young Leader Award recognises and celebrates exceptional people aged 18-29 from across the Commonwealth, who are taking the lead in their communities and using their skills to transform lives. Winners of this prestigious Award will receive a unique package of training, mentoring and networking, including a one-week residential programme in the UK during which they will collect their Award from Her Majesty The Queen. With this support, Award winners will be expected to continue and develop the amazing work they are already doing in their communities.

Applications to become a 2016 Queen’s Young Leader are open from 22nd June – 7th September 2015. Last year 3 Canadians were chosen and 4 received honorable mention.

Apply at: http://www.queensyoungleaders.com/apply-now/

AAA-AD Student Awards – Apply!

If you are planning on attending the American Anthropological Association annual meeting, held in Denver, CO, consider applying for these awards.  These are specific to the Archaeology Division.  More than one award is available in each of the two categories!!

Applications for the following should be sent to the AD Secretary, Jane Eva Baxter:  jbaxter@depaul.edu

Student Diversity Travel Grant: Four awards of up to $600 are available to help cover the travel costs associated with attending the AAA meeting. These grants are intended to increase participation in AAA sessions and in archaeology more widely by students from historically under-represented populations. African American, Alaskan Native, American Indian or Native American, Asian American, Latino and Latina, Chicano and Chicana, and Pacific Islander students in archaeology are encouraged to apply for these travel grants. Archaeology students with disabilities are also eligible for this grant. For more information see: http://www.aaanet.org/sections/ad/awards/#Student_Diversity. The deadline for application is September 15.

Applications for the following should be sent to the AD Student Member-at-Large, Lindsay Montgomery: lmmontgo@stanford.edu 

Student Membership award: The AD awards the next year’s membership in both AAA and AD to up to 20 students who present archaeological papers or posters at the annual meeting. All undergraduate and graduate students who present an archaeological paper or poster at the annual meeting are eligible to apply for this award. For further information please see:   http://www.aaanet.org/sections/ad/awards/#Student_Membership. The deadline for application is September 15.

Aspirations to be the next John Marshall or Tim Asch?

If you don’t recognise the names, John Marshall or Tim Asch, then it’s time to take a look at some classic anthropological films, such as The Hunters (1957) or N!ai: The Story of a !Kung Woman (1980), and The Feast (1969) or The Ax Fight (1975).  Marshall and Asch directed and produced these documentaries.

If you are interested in becoming an anthropological fillmmaker, test your acumen by entering The Archaeology Channel (TAC) International Film and Video Festival.  Read the guidelines carefully!!  For TAC’s last Festival, they received 95 entries from 22 countries.

Deadline for receipt of entries: October 15, 2015.  Don’t wait to the last week to enter.

Attend the four-day festival of juried films and videos on archaeological and indigenous topics, May 12-15, 2016, at the Eugene Hilton and Conference Center in Eugene, OR.

Developing a skill set

Wondering about finding that dream job; well besides your degree, you need a particular skill set.  These can be developed through the courses taken but also through volunteering.

Below is a list of the requisites for a position, entitled, Civic Engagement Associate.  I’ve selected this as an example since, quite often, there are students seeking employment with an NGO.  Some of the particulars are related to the organisation itself but you can generalise how certain criteria are applied.

  • Strong cross-sectional analysis around civil rights issues related to civic engagement activities (including naturalization process and voter mobilization), race relations, immigration, economic development, access to institutional and non-institutional resources and hate crimes within the framework of these issues impacting specific communities.
  • A proven track record of successful community or labor organizing or at least 3 years leading campaigns.
  • History of demonstrated experience in leading community based advocacy efforts within culturally diverse communities.
  • Ability to work collaboratively and independently to provide hands-on project management through all phases of project development process:  Research, planning (development of time-lines, work plans, and budget), implementation, tracking, and evaluation.
  • Experience with presentation, facilitation and training to small as well as large groups.
  • Demonstrated ability to write in an accurate, concise, and audience appropriate manner on complex public policy issues.
  • Serve as the primary staff liaison and support to the advisory groups for each of the projects/programs assigned.

Additional desired qualifications:

  • At minimum, undergraduate degree in political science, sociology, psychology, anthropology, a related field, or commensurate experience.
  • Strong public speaking and presentation skills.
  • Strong organization and time management skills.

Writing, speaking publicly, and critical analysis are all found in the classroom, including the ‘dreaded’ group work.  Since some jobs, like this, ask for a proven track record, this is where volunteerism comes into play.  Also remember that you will be asked for referees.  In this particular case, FOUR professional references and two personal were requested. This means you need to develop relationships with those who will vouch for your expertise/skill set.  You don’t have to be best buddies with your professor but s/he should know you well enough to remember who you are and something about your interests and abilities.