BEADS articles on Academia.edu and SURFACE

To all those interested in beads and/or beadwork, a batch of articles from BEADS: Journal of the Society of Bead Researchers has been uploaded to Academia.edu. All articles in Volumes 1-17 have been uploaded to the site.

Visit: https://independent.academia.edu/KarlisKarklins

As well, volumes 1-6 have been uploaded to the Syracuse University SURFACE site.

The Society of Bead Researchers is a non-profit scientific-educational corporation founded in 1981 to foster historical, archaeological, and material cultural research on beads and beadwork of all materials and periods, and to expedite the dissemination of the resultant knowledge.

Japan 2015 MEXT Scholarship

The Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) of the Government of Japan is currently accepting applications for its 2015 Research Student for foreign students who wish to study at Japanese universities.

The Research Student Scholarship is aimed at university graduates, born on or after April 2, 1980 (for the 2015 scholarship year) who wish to study as research students. The research study area should be the same field that the applicant has studied or a related field.  The term of the scholarship is 18 months to two years (including 6 months of Japanese language training) starting in April or October 2015.

Application guides and forms are available on the Consulate General of Japan’s website:
www.vancouver.ca.emb-japan.go.jp/en/culture/mext.htm. Deadline for the 2015 scholarship year: May 16, 2014. Applicants who successfully pass the written application screening are required to undertake an interview and examination (English and Japanese language) to be held in late June/early July.

If you have any questions, please contact Steve Chevalier at 604.684.5868, ext. 391 or by Email at education@vc.mofa.go.jp.

Steve Chevalier
Assistant to the Consul, Cultural Affairs
*********************************
Consulate General of Japan
900-1177 West Hastings Street
Vancouver, BC V6E 2K9

Pimu Catalina Island Field School

The Pimu Catalina Island Archaeology Field School is a collaborative research project with Tongva/Gabrielino tribal members, the Santa Catalina Island Conservancy and California State University, Northridge. The field school runs from July 18, 2011 to August 15, 2014 and is Register of Professional Archaeologists (RPA) certified.

In its seventh year, the field school provides students with practical working knowledge of survey, excavation, lab and cataloging methods while immersing them in the 9,000 years of prehistoric maritime history of the Tongva/Gabrielino nation. Students will also learn about how to apply cultural resource laws to public sector archaeological work.

Situated just off the coast of Los Angeles, Catalina Island was historically an important trading supply outpost for Southern California and beyond. The field school is part of the on-going Pimu Catalina Island Archaeological Project (PCIAP), which is working to assess and protect archaeological sites on Catalina.

For More Information See: http://www.pimu.weebly.com

Please contact Wendy Teeter at wendy.teeter@csun.edu or at (310) 825- 1864 if you would like to participate.

DEADLINE:  Priority given to applications received before March 1, 2014. Applications received after this date will be reviewed on a space available basis.

Field School / Delegation to Guatemala, May 12-25, 2014

The University Of Northern British Columbia (UNBC) & Rights Action invite you to join an
EDUCATIONAL FIELD SCHOOL / DELEGATION TO GUATEMALA
MAY 12-25, 2014

GEOGRAPHIES OF CULTURE, RIGHTS & POWER:
The Global Order, Injustice, and Resistance in Guatemala

The UNBC Geography Program and Rights Action are co-organizing a Geography field school to Guatemala for the Spring 2014 semester, Our tentative dates are late April/early May (on-campus) and May 2014 (Guatemala portion) – tentatively May 12-25, 2014.

APPLICATIONS & DEADLINES:
We hope you will consider participating in this Field school and, perhaps, inform other students who may be interested as well.  This field school is for UNBC students as well as students at universities across Canada – both senior undergrads & graduate students.  We will facilitate non-UNBC student participation via Skype before our departure.

Please contact us for an application form – DUE: December 10, 2013.

THE PLAN:
The first week of the course takes place at the UNBC campus in Prince George. Students will prepare for this intense week of classes by reading material made available one month before the course commences — tentatively planned for the end of April into early days of May 2014. During the UNBC-based seminars we will discuss both theoretical issues of power and human rights as well as specific historical and contemporary aspects of Guatemala’s violent past and present. Pre-reading and course work will help to prepare you for an intense Field School experience in Guatemala.

Weeks two and three take place in Guatemala. Grahame Russell of Rights Action will facilitate all aspects of our time in Guatemala including set-up, guiding, translation, transportation, and so forth. All students will return to Antigua for a final day of reflection, discussion, and analysis of our various experiences. The final form and content of the Field school will be worked out in consultation with Rights Action, participating students, and Dr. Nolin.

Over the course of 14 full days in Guatemala, participants will meet with Guatemalans and some North Americans working for human rights and the environment. The group will travel (by rented van) to and spend nights in rural communities seeking justice for environmental and health harms caused by North American mining companies; to the coffee-growing regions of the country to meet with indigenous organizations working for Fair Trade and equitable trade arrangements; communities resisting forced eviction from their ancestral lands to make way for African palm ‘for export’; meet with people working for the rights of sweat-shop (maquiladora) workers; and human rights organizations & the Guatemalan Forensic Anthropology Foundation who work to clarify past violence, historical memory and justice. (Closer to the actual dates, UNBC-Rights Action will set out a detailed 14-day itinerary.)

TYPE OF PARTICIPANT:
This field school / delegation is for undergraduates & graduate students who are concerned about: global exploitation and poverty; military interventions and repression; the global “development” model and environmental destruction; and, about courageous people and their courageous work and struggles for community-controlled development, protection of the environment, human rights and justice, and for democracy.

FIELD SCHOOL LEADERS –
CATHERINE NOLIN:  Dr. Catherine Nolin is an Associate Professor of Geography and has long-standing interests in issues of Maya refugee movement, Guatemalan migration and refugee experiences in Canada, and critical development studies. Catherine has organized and facilitated six field schools to Guatemala in 2004, 2006, 2008, 2010 (plus a graduate student delegation in August 2010), and 2012 and one interdisciplinary field school to Peru.

GRAHAME RUSSELL:  Grahame Russell is a non-practising lawyer, adjunct professor at the University of Northern British Colombia, author, and, since 1995, co-director of Rights Action. Rights Action funds community-controlled development, environmental defense and human rights projects in Guatemala and Honduras, as well as Chiapas, El Salvador and Oaxaca; and carries out education and activism work in the USA and Canada related to global human rights, environmental and development issues.

COURSES:
REQUIRED COURSES:
GEOGRAPHY 333 – GEOGRAPHY Field School
GEOGRAPHY 426/626 – GEOGRAPHIES of Culture, Rights & Power

OPTIONAL COURSE:
INDEPENDENT Study (arranged with your home program taken concurrently or immediately after the field school)

COST = $1400 + airfare + tuition

Items
Expense
Weeks One & Two: food, accommodation, translation, guiding, and honorariums for local community-based groups – based on approx. 14 days in-country
$1400 (approx.)
Total excluding:
·         Airfare
·         meals in Antigua
·         spending money
·         UNBC tuition fees & reading material
$900-$1000
$60
$150 (?)
$1000
 Rough Guide to Total Costs
$3600

This field school fee covers: 14 nights of hotel; 3 meals a day for 14 days; transportation in-country; trip organization, guiding, translation; honorariums for some people and communities we meet with, etc. (Participants pay for their own travel to and from Guatemala – though we will coordinate schedules to travel together)

RISK:
Grahame & Catherine will have discussions with interested persons about the possible risks involved with this delegation, before people decide to join or not. Since 1995, with Rights Action, Grahame has planned and led over 50 such delegations to Honduras, Guatemala, Chiapas and Oaxaca, and never had any serious problems.

FOR MORE INFORMATION:
Grahame Russell, info@rightsaction.org, 1-860-751-4285
Catherine Nolin, Catherine.nolin@unbc.ca, 1-250-960-5875

Multicultural Speakers Series – month of October

A number of the speakers are VIU students so here’s your opportunity to support peers; one of our own is among the first scheduled!

The Multicultural Speaker Series
Starting October 2, 2013

Stereotypes, racist comments, negative headlines in media about various countries, can leave people who have immigrated here viewed through a single lens. The Multicultural Speaker Series, a partnership of Central Vancouver Island Multicultural Society and the City of Nanaimo, aims to widen the lens through which we view other countries, and immigrants in Nanaimo, many of whom are our neighbours.

This free speaker series, open to the public, will take place over four Wednesday Nights in October (Oct 2nd, 9th, 16th and 23rd) from 6:30pm to 8:00pm at the Rugby Clubhouse, 6700 Dover Road.

Each night two guest speakers from different parts of the world including: Iraq, Israel, China, Sudan and Ethiopia will take the stage to share information and experiences about their country of origin. Each evening will also have a different guest MC who will introduce the speakers and ask questions, including: David Stanley, the author of numerous travel guidebooks (Lonely Planet and Moon Handbooks), Kait Burgan, host of daily magazine show, Go! Island and Katrin Roth Von Szepesbéla Director, Human Rights and Respectful Workplace at VIU.

“This is a wonderful opportunity for us to better understand our neighbours, develop respectful relationships and reduce discrimination” says Samantha Letourneau, Diversity Coordinator at the Multicultural Society.

John Horn, Social Planner with the City of Nanaimo, believes that a successful city must include healthy relationships between all residents

To learn more about the IMMIGRANT WELCOME CENTRE and our many services for new immigrants and the community please call, visit or browse our website!

Multicultural Speaker Series Poster 
Updated list of speakers can be found online.

Traditional Pitcook, North Saanich, Sep 21

Hopefully a number of you can attend, this pitcook looks like it will be an amazing opportunity.
—-

Please come out to what we hope will be the First Annual Traditional Foods Pitcook at the North Saanich Farm Market on Saturday, September 21.  We’re very proud of our little market and for the first time we will be showcasing local traditional foods and traditional food cooking methods.  We acknowledge the traditional territory of the Tseycum First Nation where the market and this event are being held, and look forward to spending time with Chief Vern Jacks and others during this exciting initiative.

NSFM-Pitcook-2013

Here’s a little more detail on the activities:
Friday, Sept. 20: 6:00 – 8:00 pm
  Pit #1 is assembled with venison (yes, local) and camas bulbs (courtesy of Swan Lake Native Plant Garden).  This will be a 16 hour pitcook.
Saturday, Sept. 21: 7:00 – 8:30 am
  Pit #2 is assembled with a selection of root veggies.  This will be a 4 hour pitcook.
Saturday: 10:30 am – 12:00 pm (approx.), during the Farm Market
  Cordage-making Workshop (with Brenda Beckwith) and Storytelling (with John Bradley Williams, Tsawout).
  Also, over an open fire we will making bannock and Earl Claxton Jr. (Tsawout) will be cooking salmon, clams, and venison.
  And (yes, there’s more), during the Farm Market, Ken Josephson and others will host an interactive Community Mapping display and table.
Saturday: 12:00 am – 12:30 pm
  Opening the pits!  Farm Market ends.
Saturday: 12:30 am – 1:30 pm (approx.)
  Sampling foods and sharing in wild-crafted tea, all by donation. YUM!
We hope you can make it up to the tippy-top of the Peninsula on Saturday, Sept. 21 It’s really not that far!
Sincerely,
Brenda Beckwith & Penny Gibbs

Welcome – Shq’apthut (Gathering Place), Nanaimo

With a new academic year, there are a number of events (download the flyer) that will be held in the Gathering Place (Shq’apthut) for the month of September.

During the first week, Sep 5, a Welcome Feast is hosted by Aboriginal Alumni for all New Aboriginal Students.  Welcome Feasts representing Snuneymuxw (Sep 10), Kwak waka’wakw (Sep 12), Nuu-chah-nulth (Sep 16), and Métis (Sep 18) peoples are held during the second and third week.

Please note that the first event is for new aboriginal students only; all other events are open to everyone.  Consider yourself invited!!

 

Arson at U’mista Cultural Centre, Alert Bay

Umista announcement

As a result of the fire, the Potlatch Collection has been profoundly affected and has required the efforts of conservation specialists from RBCM, MOA, and Museum at Campbell River.

READ:
Curator lends her expert hand (Campbell River Mirror)

Jack Knox: Arson imperils the cultural heart of Alert Bay (Times Colonist)
If you don’t know the significance of the Potlatch Collection as a Canadian, resident of BC, or anthropologist, this Times Colonist article provides a good primer. As well, you can seek and view the documentary, Potlatch: A Strict Law Bids Us Dance (VIU Library, E 99 K9 P612 1975, 54 min).
Here’s a clip from the above documentary:

The video clip below is a preview for Box of Treasures (VIU Library, E 99 K9 B68 2004, 28 min). The documentary explains how the Potlatch Collection was returned to Alert Bay. If you don’t have time to view both documentaries, a condensed and excerpted version is available as Potlatch (22 min) in First Nations: The Circle Unbroken (VIU Library, E 78 C2 F57712).

If you wish to help the U’mista Cultural Society during this time of need, donations can be made through CanadaHelps.org.

Update from Farkwa Secondary School

As has been mentioned, ASC has raised funds to support Farkwa Secondary School since 2007.  Last year FFKF (an NGO) made ASC aware that one of the students needed assistance with boarding costs.  Here’s the mid-year report regarding the student:

Can you please pass on this report to the Anthropology Students club.  If you recall from last year, they have come to the rescue of Auzelia who needed extra assistance to pay for boarding costs.

Results for Auzelia:    Academic Progress –  satisfactory.     Attendance – excellent.

It is very hard for the secondary students as the medium of instruction is English language; and while they do learn English at primary school, they know very little when they start secondary school. In fact, English is their third language, after their tribal language and then the national language of Swahili. It can be a real struggle for them in the first year or two of secondary school.

Few students are given more than a satisfactory or good for progress. So at this stage I think Auzelia is doing OK.

As well, here are some photos illustrating the contributions made in supporting the students and the school.

Plot and "green house" for vegetable seedlings.

Plot and “green house” for vegetable seedlings.

School garden (2)

School garden to provide better nutrition for lunches.

 

School library

School library showing many of the books provided by FFKF, which ASC has helped to support with its fundraising.

 

Kryptonian Language

Who but a linguistic anthropologist could create Kryptonian?  Dr. Christine Schreyer, UBC Okanagan, did just that!  After two years of silence, she can now talk about her behind-the-scenes work for Man of Steel.  Read her Globe & Mail interview.

Listen to Dr. Schreyer talk about her work:

Based on her research on Star Trek’s Klingon language and Avatar’s Na’vi, the production designer for Man of Steel sought Schreyer’s expertise in developing Kryptonian.  The symbols created for the film are based on the First Nations Cree syllabic writing system.

As part of the marketing for Man of Steel, you can see your name in Kryptonian, as well as know your ancestral house (see mine below, House of Dar).  “My ancestors” stood for trees, roots and ancestors.  Go to the Glyph Creator.

House of Dar: Imogene

House of Dar: Imogene

If someone asks what you can do with anthropology, it might just take you to Hollywood!