Fieldwork Funding Opportunity – Jacobs Research Funds

The Jacobs Research Funds (JRF) funds projects involving fieldwork with living peoples of North, Central and South America which result in publication or other dissemination of information about the fieldwork. Priority is given to research on endangered cultures and languages, and to research on the Pacific Northwest. Projects focusing on archival research have low priority, but we welcome proposals to digitize, transcribe and translate old materials that might otherwise be lost or become inaccessible. Relevance of the project to contemporary theoretical issues in anthropology and linguistics is also a criterion used in evaluating proposals.

Funded projects typically focus on linguistic analysis, social-cultural anthropology, ethnolinguistics, or sociolinguistics. Especially appropriate are field studies that address cultural expressive systems, such as music, language, dance, mythology, world view, folk taxonomy, art, intellectual life, and religion. Also appropriate are projects focusing on cultural and linguistic forms in modern contexts, for example, traditional environmental knowledge or social organization.

Projects in archeology, physical anthropology, applied anthropology, and applied linguistics (for example, grants exclusively for technological improvements, development of pedagogical materials, etc.) are not eligible for support. It is expected that both the subjects of research and society in general will ultimately benefit from the knowledge generated by the funded research. The Jacobs Research Funds therefore do not support proprietary research for the exclusive use of any entity, public or private (such as national, state, provincial, or local governments; public or private charities, churches or foundations; tribes or bands; or community groups).

Grant categories
1. Individual Grants support research projects administered by a single investigator on a focused problem. The maximum award is $3000 USD or CAD.
2. Group Grants support work by two or more researchers who will be cooperating on the same or similar projects. The maximum award is $6000 USD or CAD.
3. The Kinkade Grants honour the memory of the late Dale Kinkade, a linguist known for his work on Salishan languages. Kinkade Grants support projects requiring an intense period of fieldwork, such as research leading to a major work such as a dictionary, collection of texts, etc. They are intended for experienced researchers, such as Ph.D. students working on dissertations, faculty with sabbatical or other period of course release, or retired professors seeking to complete major research. The maximum award is $9000 USD or CAD.

Grant recipients based in Canada will be funded in Canadian dollars through the Whatcom Museum Society British Columbia.

Application Procedure
Please see: https://depts.washington.edu/jacobsf/application.html

For any questions on the application process, please contact jgrant@cob.org

Deadline: All materials must be received by February 15th, 2016

Kryptonian Language

Who but a linguistic anthropologist could create Kryptonian?  Dr. Christine Schreyer, UBC Okanagan, did just that!  After two years of silence, she can now talk about her behind-the-scenes work for Man of Steel.  Read her Globe & Mail interview.

Listen to Dr. Schreyer talk about her work:

Based on her research on Star Trek’s Klingon language and Avatar’s Na’vi, the production designer for Man of Steel sought Schreyer’s expertise in developing Kryptonian.  The symbols created for the film are based on the First Nations Cree syllabic writing system.

As part of the marketing for Man of Steel, you can see your name in Kryptonian, as well as know your ancestral house (see mine below, House of Dar).  “My ancestors” stood for trees, roots and ancestors.  Go to the Glyph Creator.

House of Dar: Imogene

House of Dar: Imogene

If someone asks what you can do with anthropology, it might just take you to Hollywood!