BEADS articles on Academia.edu and SURFACE

To all those interested in beads and/or beadwork, a batch of articles from BEADS: Journal of the Society of Bead Researchers has been uploaded to Academia.edu. All articles in Volumes 1-17 have been uploaded to the site.

Visit: https://independent.academia.edu/KarlisKarklins

As well, volumes 1-6 have been uploaded to the Syracuse University SURFACE site.

The Society of Bead Researchers is a non-profit scientific-educational corporation founded in 1981 to foster historical, archaeological, and material cultural research on beads and beadwork of all materials and periods, and to expedite the dissemination of the resultant knowledge.

AnthroNotes Digital Project – database

News for the editors of AnthroNotes:

AnthroNotes Editors Launch Searchable, Downloadable Digital Database

Interested in ancient Egypt, Native Americans, Arctic climate change, or archaeology? Thanks to a joint effort of the Smithsonian’s Department of Anthropology and Smithsonian Libraries, anyone now can download in-depth, research-based essays and classroom tested teaching activities on a wide range of topics through the AnthroNotes digital database.

The entire collection of 84 issues of AnthroNotes (1979-2012) and 263 selected individual AnthroNotes articles, each with a new abstract, can be downloaded from the Smithsonian Libraries’ Official Digital Repository. Individual articles are offered in three formats, designed for computers (PDF), mobile devices (mobi), and e-readers (E-Pub). Articles are free of copyright restrictions; photocopying for classroom use is permitted and encouraged. All 263 individual articles, as well as the 84 issues of AnthroNotes, are also searchable through Google and the Smithsonian Collections Database (search term: AnthroNotes).

The digital AnthroNotes project was completed in the fall of 2015. The database is searchable by author, title, and year, as well as major subfields such as archaeology or linguistics. Searches may be conducted in over 40 topics including geographic regions (Africa, the Middle East, Asia); contemporary issues (refugees, forensics, genetics); and education (teaching activities, teaching resources, careers in anthropology).

In addition, Amazon carries both the paperback and the e-book version of the second, expanded edition of Anthropology Explored, The Best of Smithsonian AnthroNotes, which includes 36 AnthroNotes articles along with abstracts and recent author updates. The book’s chapters are divided into three sections: Investigating Our Origins and Variation, Examining Our Archaeological Past, and Exploring Our Many Cultures. Also available is a free online Instructors’ Guide.

Originally part of the NSF-funded George Washington University-Smithsonian Institution Anthropology for Teachers Program, AnthroNotes includes research-based articles by leading scholars in the field as well as classroom-tested activities. The publication received the Society for American Archaeology’s 2002 Award for Excellence in Public Education for “presenting archaeological and anthropological research to the public in an engaging and accessible style and for encouraging the study of these disciplines in classrooms across the nation.”

Throughout its history, AnthroNotes was published by the National Museum of Natural History’s Department of Anthropology. The museum’s Office of Education and Outreach has a website (Qrius) where you can find webcasts, online collections, and teaching resources, as well as a sign up for an e-newsletter. Visit the Q?rius website at Qrius.si.edu

The AnthroNotes editors: Alison S. Brooks, Carolyn Gecan, P. Ann Kaupp, Colleen Popson, and Ruth O. Selig

Online resources available

For those interested in the cultural and historical aspects of beads around the world and do not have access to BEADS: Journal of the Society of Bead Researchers, the articles in Volumes 1-5 have been uploaded to the academia.edu website. More will follow in the coming year. Just go to https://independent.academia.edu/KKarklins and you will see the list of all the uploaded journal articles as well as a few other bead (and other) studies by Karlis Karklins and others.

If you are interested in embossed and stamped glass bottles, check out Chapter 1 of BOTTLED IN ILLINOIS 1840-1880: Embossed Bottled and Bottled Products of Early Illinois Merchants from Chicago to Cairo.  Go to: https://www.academia.edu/18162915/BOTTLED_IN_ILLINOIS_1840-1880._Illinois_State_Archaeological_Survey._2011_792_pp_CHAPTER_1

Another resource on glass is the web reference library compiled and created by Ian Macky.  Included are glass artefact catalogs, brochures, etc. as pdfs.  The earliest document is from 1615, with others extending to 1951.

Online resource: Historical Archaeology

If you are interested in historical archaeology, the papers from the Conference on Historic Site Archaeology are available online, 15 volumes dating from 1967 to 1980.

http://scholarcommons.sc.edu/archanth_historic_site_arch_conf_papers/

Other papers from The South Carolina Institute of Archaeology and Anthropology (SCIAA) are also available online, from Annual Reports, to Archaeology Month Posters, to Occasional Papers.

http://scholarcommons.sc.edu/archanth/

 

Proceedings, Conference on Underwater Cultural Heritage

If you have an interest in underwater archaeology, its management, conservation and preservation of archaeological materials, you’ll find this resource of interest.


The 2nd Asia-Pacific Regional Conference on Underwater Cultural Heritage (www.apconf.org) was held from 12-16 May 2014 in Honolulu, Hawai‘i. The conference was hosted by the National Marine Sanctuary Foundation and the University of Hawai‘i Marine Option Program. More than 139 participants from 27 countries around the world joined together in Honolulu to discuss common goals in underwater cultural heritage research and preservation.

The proceedings for the 2014 Asia-Pacific Regional Conference on Underwater Cultural Heritage are now available, courtesy of The Museum of Underwater Archaeology. This collection includes over 100 papers, video interviews, and posters all freely available online. For example, video interviews with conference chair Dr. Hans Van Tilburg and keynote speakers Dr. James Delgado and Dr. Sayan Praicharnjit. Introductory videos by session organizers describe the reasons for convening their panels and their hopes for future research paths.

The collection is found at http://www.themua.org/collections/collections/show/13

ARCHES

Here’s another resource of particular interest to those working on European archaeological projects.

ARCHES – Archaeological Resources in Cultural Heritage: a European Standard

From the website: “The purpose of the ARCHES project is to benefit cultural heritage practice and management in Europe by developing a European standard for the creation, compilation, transfer and curation of the products of European archaeology. This will be supported by a best practice manual for archaeological archiving, which will also have a twinned web presence.”

The downloadable guide is available in seven languages.

National Park Service E-Library

The NPS Electronic Library is a portal to thousands of electronic publications, covering the cultural and natural history of the National Park Service and the national parks, monuments, and historic sites of the U.S. National Park System.  Included are a variety of NPS newsletters (e.g., Common Ground, Heritage Matters, Preservation Tech Notes), publications (e.g., BAE Bulletins, Reports of the Chaco Center, Urban Ecology), and more.

NPShistory.com was created by two individuals who have a passion for the National Park System: Dr. Harry A. Butowsky and Randall D. Payne.  Both have extensive experience working and volunteering, respectively, with the NPS.

For National Park Service resources from the official website, go to: http://www.nps.gov/history/publications.htm

Historical Publications of Parks Canada

A new website has been created to showcase the rich history of the Canadian National Park System. The National Parks, Historic Sites, and Marine Conservation Areas present a Canadian cultural and natural history textbook. The goal of this new website is to be the largest digital library of hard-to-find, long out-of-print, Parks Canada publications. From its first director, J.B. Harkin, to the present day, Parks Canada has produced a wealth of books, technical reports, and visitor information literature.

ParksCanadaHistory.com could not have been created without the help and
support of Dr. Alan MacEachern, Associate Professor of Canadian History at
the University of Western Ontario and Director of NiCHE.

To visit the site, go to: http://parkscanadahistory.com/

Northeast Historical Archaeology – online

Northeast Historical Archaeology has been digitized and is now  available online in full-text from Volume 1, 1971 on: http://digitalcommons.buffalostate.edu/neha/.

Northeast Historical Archaeology is the journal of the Council for Northeast Historical Archaeology. The Council for Northeast Historical Archaeology (CNEHA), founded in 1967, is a non-profit organization dedicated to archaeological scholarship in the American Northeast, including the Canadian provinces and the U.S. states of Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Newfoundland and Labrador, New Brunswick, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Nova Scotia, Ontario, Pennsylvania, Prince Edward Island, Quebec, Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia, and West Virginia. Since the spring of 1971, the journal has explored the history of Northeastern North America through archaeological finds in the area.

Additional information about the Council for Northeast Historical Archaeology can be found on the Council’s website http://www.cneha.org/  Order forms for print copies of the journal and posters from our Telling Time poster series can be found at www.buffalostate.edu/neha