Classical Archaeology in Transylvania, Romania

Sitting at the crossroads between Europe and Asia, Transylvania (Romania) plays a fundamental role in the development of the European world. By its geographic location, it is situated on the main communication and technological axes in and out of Europe and, as a result, became a very dynamic zone of culture synthesis. At the same time, not only it has the largest salt concentration in Eastern and Southeastern Europe, but it also provides easy access to massive deposits of copper, tin, iron, gold and coal. Since the earliest moments of tribal and then state formation, Transylvania has been at the core of most power struggles in Eastern-Southeastern Europe. Our programs invite students and volunteers to explore, excavate and experience the genesis of European culture from the Iron Age to the Middle Ages. Our participants can register to more than one project to expand their horizons in field archaeology, funerary archaeology, bioarchaeology of children and osteology.

Excavation: Roman Provincial – Life by the Imperial Road
Location: Rapolt, Hunedoara County (Southern Transylvania), Romania
Period: Imperial Roman – Provincial
Excavation dates: June 1 – July 5, 2014

More information: http://archaeotek.orgroman_provincial_settlement_excavation

Contact e-mail: archaeology@archaeotek.org

Description: Our research area is situated between the richest gold deposits in Europe, the Dacian Kingdom’s political and religious capital and its fortified satellites in the Carpathian Mountains, and Sarmizegetusa Ulpia Traiana, the Roman capital of the Dacian provinces and the first Roman city North of the Danube, southwestern Transylvania was a highly integrated military, political, and economic region. During the Roman colonial occupation, 102-271AD, our target area around Simeria and Rapolt shows a very dynamic and intensive synthesis of Roman provincial life, where a multitude of processes of colonization and creolization take place side by side. Our project seeks to explore and understand the integration of all these structural provincial elements along the main Roman axes of communication and transport. Our excavations will aim at evaluating the importance and impact of the proximity of the main axis of movement, communication and commerce on the Roman provincial rural life, and its evolution through time.

For more information on this program, see attached or visit www.archaeotek.org.